FutureStarr

Definition of a republic

Definition of a republic

Definition of a republic

rÄ“-pub′lik, n. a commonwealth: a form of government without a monarch, in which the supreme power is vested in representatives elected by the people.—adj. Repub′lican, belonging to a republic: agreeable to the principles of a republic.—n. one who advocates a republican form of government: a democrat: one of the two great political parties in the United States, opposed to the Democrats, favouring a high protective tariff, a liberal expenditure, and an extension of the powers of the national government.—v.t. Repub′licanise.—n. Repub′licanism, the principles of republican government: attachment to republican government.—n. Republicā′rian.—Republic of Letters, a name for the general body of literary and learned men.—Republican era, the era adopted by the French after the downfall of the monarchy, beginning with 22d September 1792.

Republic

This is an extraordinary moment. We're seeing our country turn into a banana republic. Republicans better be careful what they wish for because a Democratic president could use the same tools President Donald Trump is to turn the White House into one big extension of his reelection campaign, if that's the direction they take, attacking the whistleblower, trying to coverup this corruption, it's a really, really said day for the country.The republic, as I at least understand it, means association, of which liberty is only an element, a necessary antecedent. It means association, a new philosophy of life, a divine Ideal that shall move the world, the only means of regeneration vouchsafed to the human race.

Why do men behave justly? Is it because they fear societal punishment? Are they trembling before notions of divine retribution? Do the stronger elements of society scare the weak into submission in the name of law? Or do men behave justly because it is good for them to do so? Is justice, regardless of its rewards and punishments, a good thing in and of itself? How do we define justice? Plato sets out to answer these questions in The Republic. He wants to define justice, and to define it in such a way as to show that justice is worthwhile in and of itself. He meets these two challenges with a single solution: a definition of justice that appeals to human psychology, rather than to perceived behavior. (Source:www.sparknotes.com)

State

There are several political implications that arise from the U.S. being a republic. Laws passed by the majority — through their representatives in government (federal or local) — can be challenged and overturned if they violate the U.S. constitution. For example, Jim Crow laws mandating racial segregation were deemed unconstitutional and were repealed, and in Brown v. Board of Education, the U.S. Supreme Court repealed state-sponsored school segregation. In more recent cases, the 2010 healthcare reform bill (a.k.a. Obamacare) was challenged in the U.S. Supreme Court because it forces individuals to buy health insurance.

The law was passed by a majority in Congress, but critics claim that it violates individual liberties by forcing individuals to engage in commerce, a power that the government does not have in this republic. Ultimately, the Court ruled the individual mandate was constitutional but that states should not be required to expand Medicaid.Another example is California Proposition 8, a state constitutional amendment in which a majority of voters in California voted to make same-sex marriages illegal. Critics of the law argue that this violates the individual liberties of gay and lesbian couples, and the majority does not have a right to do that in a republic. While courts in California upheld the amendment deeming it constitutional, a federal court overturned it, judging that it was unconstitutional under both the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment. (Source: www.diffen.com)

 

 

Related Articles