FutureStarr

Daisy fleabane identification

Daisy fleabane identification

Daisy fleabane identification

The native Daisy Fleabane is fairly common and it has been reported from almost all counties of Illinois (see Distribution Map). Habitats include black soil prairies, gravel prairies, hill prairies, limestone glades, dry savannas, eroding clay banks, pastures and abandoned fields, areas along railroads, and roadsides. While Daisy Fleabane is a pioneer species that prefers areas with a history of disturbance, it is more likely to be found in higher quality natural areas than the closely related Annual Fleabane (Erigeron annuus).

Fleabane

Daisy Fleabane is fairly common and has been reported from almost all counties of Illinois (see Distribution Map). Habitats include upland areas of black soil prairies, gravel prairies, hill prairies, limestone glades, dry savannas, eroding clay banks, pastures and abandoned fields, and areas along roadsides and railroads. While this plant species favors disturbed areas, it is more likely to occur in higher quality habitats than the closely related Erigeron annuus (Annual Fleabane).Erigeron annuus, whose scientific name accurately indicates it is an annual plant. Erigeron comes from Greek meaning "early" and "old man," which allude to the plant's tendency to blossom in late spring and to form fuzzy white seed heads while still producing new flowers. Daisy fleabane, like other fleabane wildflowers, derives its common name from the superstition that dried clusters of these plants could be used to rid a dwelling of fleas. Although it cannot do that, it is however used as a diuretic and medicine for digestive ailments.

Daisy fleabane is a delicate wildflower that measures approximately 30-150 cm. in height. Each plant has several composite flowers that look typically daisy-like, having a yellow central disk surrounded by white, petal-like rays. Composite flowers are positioned singularly atop the terminal shoot of downy stems. The leaves are also hairy, lanceolate, and coarsely toothed.There are a number of species of Fleabanes. They all have numerous rays of various colors surrounding a flat yellow disc. They are either annual, biennial or perennial, and with the number of different species, they can be in flower from late spring to fall. Eastern Daisy Fleabane is a native erect annual, growing from 2 to 4 feet high, with many leaves and long spreading hairs (without glands) on the stem. Near the top of the stem hair may be flattened. The stem usually branches below the floral array. The stem also has shallow vertical ridges. (Source: www.friendsofthewildflowergarden.org)

 

 

Related Articles