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Cranberry Viburnum

Cranberry Viburnum

Cranberry Viburnum

The unique nature of the vibrant, showy yellow fall color of High Bush Cranberry can help you draw attention to any garden or landscape. The shrubs also provide an annual harvest of hand-sized to slightly larger berries which are rare and can be eaten fresh or canned.Viburnum rhytidophyllum is a popular evergreen species, grown mainly for its foliage effect of large, dark green leathery leaves with strongly wrinkled surface. This is the parent species of two popular hybrid cultivars known as 'Alleghany' and '{ragense'. 'Alleghany' was selected from a hybrid between V. rhytidophyllum and V. lantana 'Mohican' (in 1958, at the US National Arboretum).

Viburnum

I first noticed the beautiful fragrance of Koreanspice viburnum (Viburnum carlesii) planted as a hedge at a commercial site. The bushes were as tall as small trees and had an abundant display of reddish pink buds turning to white flowers. I knew that viburnums needed more hours of daily sun than available in our wooded yard, but I had to try one. I brought home just one, not realizing that in this case more than one viburnum was necessary for fruiting, since no berries ever appeared. (More on this later.) Although the bush produced some flowers in the spring (more sun would have encouraged more blooms), there were no blue-black fruits in fall to attract birds.Out of the five native viburnums covered in this article, Virginia Tech Dendrology identifies mapleleaf (V. acerifolium) as being monoecious; the other four natives are not identified as being either monoecious or dioecious.

According to the New York Botanical Garden FAQ, “Viburnums are monoecious but you will get better fruits by planting plants from different sources. This is particularly true of V. davidii which is usually described as being dioecious.”Most viburnums grow well when planted in moist, rich and slightly acidic soil (pH 5.5 to 6.5). Incorporate organic soil conditioner at planting, so that the future root area of the planting bed contains 10 to 20 percent organic matter. Mulch the plants or bed with 4 to 6 inches of pine straw or 2 to 3 inches of bark. Plants should be spaced at least 4 to 10 feet apart, depending on the mature size of the cultivar.Periodically remove old and weak canes. The height and spread of most viburnums can be regulated with selective thinning pruning in early spring. If an overgrown plant needs to be renewal pruned, this should be done in the early spring. Some of the small-leafed evergreen viburnums can be sheared, but be aware that shearing will remove most flower buds and/or berries. To preserve flowers, wait to prune until just after bloom. (Source: hgic.clemson.edu)

 

 

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