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Cornus Racemosa

Cornus Racemosa

Cornus Racemosa

Corns are perennial, flowering shrubs that are native to the Mediterranean region. Cornus racemosa plants are often grown in flower gardens for their profuse white flowers and attractive foliage.Murrell, Zack E.; Poindexter, Derick B. (2016). "Cornus racemosa". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). 12. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.Cornus racemosa, the northern swamp dogwood, gray dogwood, or panicle dogwood, is a shrubby plant native to southeastern Canada and the northeastern United States. It is a member of the dogwood genus Cornus and the family Cornaceae.

Cornu

This small dogwood is sometimes cultivated as a multistemmed shrub. Generally, Gray Dogwood (Cornus racemosa) can be distinguished from other Dogwood shrubs by its dome-shaped panicles of flowers, which are about as tall as they are wide. Other species in this genus produce flat-topped panicles of flowers that are wider than they are tall. Except for Cornus obliqua, the leaves of Gray Dogwood are more slender than those of other Dogwood species. The mature berries of Gray Dogwood are white, rather than pale blue or dark blue-violet. Other species in this genus with white berries include Cornus drummondii (Rough-Leaved Dogwood) and Cornus sericea (Red-Osier Dogwood). Rough-Leaved Dogwood has leaves that are more hairy and broad than those of Gray Dogwood, and its stems are also hairy, rather than smooth. It is often, but not always, a larger shrub than Gray Dogwood. Red-Osier Dogwood also has wider leaves and its stems are bright red to a much greater extent.

Tough and adaptable, Cornus racemosa (Gray Dogwood) is a thicket-forming, deciduous shrub with an excellent blue-green foliage of elliptic to lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 in. long (10 cm). In late spring to early summer, small creamy-white flowers appear in flattened clusters and provide a great floral show. They are borne atop conspicuously red stems and attract bees and butterflies. They are followed by white berries, which persist into fall, unless devoured by birds and other wildlife. Their bright red fruit stalks persist after the berries are gone, and are quite ornamental. The foliage turns deep reddish purple in the fall. Resistant to most diseases and insects, Gray Dogwood can be used in erosion control, as a filler in the shrub border or left alone to spread in naturalized areas.Cornus racemosa is a common shrub, found nearly throughout Wisconsin except for a few northern counties. Though it will tolerate moderate shade, it does best in various open habitats, both natural and man-made. It is common along the edges of woods and sometimes along the edge of lakes and streams, though not often in very wet soil. It is often abundant in abandoned fields and pastures and along road and other rights-of-way and is sometimes a pest species in grasslands. (Source:www.uwgb.edu)

 

 

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