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Canada Moonseed

Canada Moonseed

Canada Moonseed

Canada Moonseed leaves are rather variable in size and shape. The more deeply lobed leaves may resemble Wild Cucumber (Echinocystis lobata) or Wild Grape (Vitis riparia), while the less lobed leaves may resemble Bur Cucumber (Sicyos angulatus), or Wild Yam (Dioscorea villosa). Of these species, only Grape and Moonseed have woody stems. The unique leaf stalk attachment (peltate) and the single, crescent-shaped seed in the mature fruit further distinguishes Canada Moonseed from all the rest. The fruits are reportedly toxic and should not be eaten. Pastry chef Keiko St. Leger is bringing Japanese pastry to the Canadian consciousness in this charming and tasty blog, offering tutorials and recipes like the popular Canadian cornflake cookie.

Moonseed

Notes: Canada Moonseed is indigenous to the Garden. Eloise Butler noted it in her log on May 25, 1907 and then brought in more with plants collected right in Glenwood Park on May 31, 1907. [Glenwood Park surrounded the Garden area and is now named Theodore Wirth Park] She planted an additional plant in 1909 and on July 17, 1910 found that the plant already existed in another part of the Garden and found more on Aug. 14, 1912. That did not stop her from importing another from Minnehaha Park on Oct. 2, 1917, from Glenwood Park in 1919 and from Ft.

Snelling in 1920. When the Upland section of the Garden was developed after 1944, Martha Crone planted Moonseed in 1946 and in 1947 along the fence where it still grows today.Canada Moonseed is native to a broad range of counties across the state with scattered exceptions and absent in the Arrowhead. In North America it is found in the eastern half of the continent except for Louisiana in the south, Maine in the north and in Canada it is known in the Provinces of Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. (Source: www.friendsofthewildflowergarden.org)

 

 

 

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