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Borderland beat.

Borderland beat.

Borderland beat

Borderland Beat (BB) is an English language news blog that reports on the Mexican Drug War. The blog was started in 2009 by an anonymous individual using the pseudonym Buggs. BB's reporters are mostly based in the U.S. and Mexico. Their main focus is to provide English coverage of the drug war in Mexico, by creating analysis and research material about drug cartels, criminal figures, and the effects on the ongoing drug war, as well as translating Spanish articles into English.

The work Borderland Beat: Reporting on the Mexican Cartel Drug War represents the first book (& ebook) to be published by this blog site. Borderland Beat is an informational and collaborative English language blog (drawing upon US and Mexican contributors) reporting on the Mexican narco wars. The blog is a contemporary raw feed of unassessed information. The Borderland Beat blog focuses on non-professional (volunteer) Spanish to English translations with less journalistic interpretation and/or detailed analysis linked to the contributions. The work joins in the same ‘digital blog/online journal to book’ publishing trend as seen with SWJ—El Centro (since 2012) and Blog del Narco (in 2013). (Source: smallwarsjournal.com)

CARTEL

Borderland Beat (BB) is an English language news blog that reports on the Mexican Drug War. The blog was started in 2009 by an anonymous individual using the pseudonym Buggs. BB's reporters are mostly based in the U.S. and Mexico. Their main focus is to provide English coverage of the drug war in Mexico, by creating analysis and research material about drug cartels, criminal figures, and the effects on the ongoing drug war, as well as translating Spanish articles into English. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Buggs' intention was to report about the Mexican Drug War to U.S. readers. Buggs began translating Mexican drug cartel news articles from Spanish to English since mid-2008 but was using his personal blog as a platform. Realizing the dangers of reporting on his personal blog, he created BB and hosted it on Blogger, a platform owned by Google. Buggs came up with the name of the blog because "borderland" refers to a geographical space or zone around a territorial border, in this case the U.S.-Mexico border. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

The gun control debate is revived with every mass shooting. But far more people die from gun deaths on the street corners of inner city America and across the border as Mexico’s powerful cartels battle to control the drug trade. Guns and drugs aren’t often connected in our heated discussions of gun control - but they should be. In Ioan Grillo’s groundbreaking new work of investigative journalism, he shows us this connection by following the market for guns in the Americas and how it has made the continent the most murderous on earth. (Source: www.audible.com)

At first glance Gabriel Cardona is the poster-boy American teenager: great athlete, bright, handsome, and charismatic. But the streets of his border town of Laredo, Texas, are poor and dangerous, and it isn't long before Gabriel abandons his promising future for the allure of the Zetas, a drug cartel with roots in the Mexican military. His younger friend, Bart, as well as others from Gabriel's childhood join him in working for the Zetas, boosting cars and smuggling drugs, eventually catching the eye of the cartel's leadership.At first glance Gabriel Cardona is the poster-boy American teenager: great athlete, bright, handsome, and charismatic. But the streets of his border town of Laredo, Texas, are poor and dangerous, and it isn't long before Gabriel abandons his promising future for the allure of the Zetas, a drug cartel with roots in the Mexican military. His younger friend, Bart, as well as others from Gabriel's childhood join him in working for the Zetas, boosting cars and smuggling drugs, eventually catching the eye of the cartel's leadership. (Source:

smallwarsjournal.com)The Borderland Beat book focuses on more organized narco violence taking place in Mexico during the 2008 through 2013 era before the later cartel fragmentation due to kingpin targeting—when Alex Marentes was more directly involved with the blog. It draws its material via the site’s blog posts and the author’s professional (rather than academic) directed research. The book cover is Mexican skull art based with elements of violence—bullet rounds, revolvers, barbed wire, pills, fire, and brass knuckles—combined together to create a narcocultura inspired skull. The work is 232 pages long and devoid of page numbers. It provides no references, citations, or notes, other than one or two URLs, but is supported by the author’s website which has some sources and videos. The work contains numerous images of drug war violence (not sourced) and is divided into the following listing of impressionistic and interpretive themes (with somewhat more structure evident at the end of the work related to specific cartels and timelines). The titles of these themes (which follows an ad hoc capitalization protocol) are as follows: (Source:

 

 

 

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