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Boehmeria Cylindrica

Boehmeria Cylindrica

Boehmeria Cylindrica

Boufford, David E. (1997). "Boehmeria cylindrica". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). 3. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA. Boehmeria cylindrica, or the green alpine plant, is indigenous to the Himalayas and is one of few plants that have adapted to life in high mountain ultracont places. The plant, which grows as much as two meters wide and two meters tall, can tolerate amazingly cold environments, living as high up as 3,000 meters above sea level with temperatures below -20 degrees Celsius (US -4 degrees Fahrenheit).

Boehmeria

Preferring medium-wet and semi-shady sites, Boehmeria cylindrica, also called Bog Hemp, lacks the stinging hairs of some of its nettle cousins. Stringy heads of tiny yellow-green flowers form between leaf stems in summer. Moths and butterflies are attracted to this modest plant. It serves as a host plant for the larvae of several butterflies including the Red Admiral, Eastern Comma, and Question Mark butterflies. The larvae of the Flowing-line Bomolocha moth also make use of its foliage.This perennial plant is about 2-3' tall, branching occasionally. This member of the Nettle family lacks stinging hairs. The stems are light green, 4-angled or round, and glabrous or slightly pubescent. The leaves are usually opposite along the stems, but sometimes they are alternate. They are ovate or ovate-lanceolate, up to 4" long and 2�" across, and have long slender petioles. The upper surface of each leaf is dark green (in the shade) and glabrous or slightly pubescent; a central vein and 2 parallel secondary veins are readily observable.

The margins are coarsely serrated. Spikes of green or greenish white flowers appear from the axils of the upper leaves. They are straight and angle upward from the axis of the central stem. The flowering spikes are about �–3" long; sometimes they are terminal, but more often they will develop additional leaves beyond the flowers. False Nettle is usually dioecious, with male and female flowers produced on separate plants. Male flowers are distributed along the spikes in bunches, while female flowers are produced along the spikes more or less continuously. These flowers are very small and lack petals. Each male flower has a 4-parted calyx and 4 stamens, while the calyx of the female flower is tubular with 2-4 teeth. The blooming period is mid-summer to early fall, and lasts about 1-2 months. There is no floral scent; pollination is by wind. The fruit consists of a small achene. This description applies to the typical woodland variety of False Nettle, Boehmeria cylindrica cylindrica. The other variety of False Nettle, Boehmeria cylindrica drummondiana, grows in the sun and has a somewhat different appearance. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

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