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AMidwest Weeds

AMidwest Weeds

Midwest Weeds

 

Noxious Weed: “Any plant designated by federal, state or local government officials as injurious to public health, agriculture, recreate, wildlife or property. Once a weed is classified as noxious authorities can implement quarantines and take other actions to contain or destroy the weed and limit its spread.” For example, Field Bindweed is considered a noxious weed. See a list of noxious weeds by state here: http://wssa.net/links/noxious-weed-list/.Invasive Weed: “Weeds that establish, persist and spread widely in natural ecosystems outside the plant’s native range. When in a foreign environment, these invaders often lack natural enemies to curtail their growth, which allows them to overrun native plants and ecosystems.” Many invasive weeds are also classified as noxious.

Weed

Drawing on the expertise of more than forty weed scientists and botanists, the guide identifies each plant at various stages of its life and offers useful details about its origin, habitat, morphology, biology, distribution, and toxic properties. The book also includes illustrations of the most common characteristics of plants and terms used to describe them, a key to plant families included in the book, a glossary of frequently used terms, a bibliography, and indexes of scientific and common plant names.Get familiar with bindweed’s arrow-shaped leaf and search for the first tendrils at ground level while weeding. If the weed is already established, pull and clip the plant repeatedly to exhaust its roots. Our plant healthcare manager recommends this trick if you’ve spotted an established vine: set up wooden stakes for it to cling to (rather than other plants); then remove the plant stake.

Compacted soil: If you see mats of prostrate knotweed, spotted spurge, or plantain, take a shovel and check whether your soil is so packed down that grass roots can't penetrate and air and water can't reach them. Weeds that tolerate compacted soil often occur in lawns that see lots of traffic, such as back yards with kids, parks and playing fields or along paths. Having the lawn core-aerated frequently to open it up to air and water should help.Wet soil and drainage problems: If you have a spot where any of these plants appear often, check it out after a rain to see if the soil is saturated. Consider installing a rain garden to make the most of a low, wet spot, or at least choose plants that like their feet wet. Maybe that low place in the lawn is a good site for a river birch. Weeds that can indicate poorly draining soil, such as clay, include common chickweed and crabgrass. (Source:www.chicagobotanic.org)

 

 

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