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American Licorice

American Licorice

American Licorice

In November 1999, American Licorice Co. joined with Ferrara Pan, Spangler, Goetze's, and NECCO to form the Candy Alliance LLC. The Alliance works to promote the mutual interests involved, through the coordination of ingredient purchasing to get lower prices, the creation of cooperative marketing and distribution programs, and the cross-licensing and development of joint products.

American

In November 1999, American Licorice Co. joined with Ferrara Pan, Spangler, Goetze's, and NECCO to form the Candy Alliance LLC. The Alliance works to promote the mutual interests involved, through the coordination of ingredient purchasing to get lower prices, the creation of cooperative marketing and distribution programs, and the cross-licensing and development of joint products. American Licorice Company (“ALC”) is a privately owned non-chocolate candy manufacturer head quartered in La Porte IN. (Red Vines® and Sour punch® brands)..

Sales of the company’s first product, Black Licorice Vines, were good, and in 1919 production was moved to larger quarters in the northwest part of the city. In 1990 American Licorice began making a new sour-flavored candy called Sour Punch Straws. When originally offered in 240-count boxes, the response was not exceptional. A smaller package was introduced a year later, however, and sales shot upward. Over the next decade the firm added numerous variations on Sour Punch including chewy Bites, Ropes, Beanz, and Twists. The 1990s also saw the introduction of a sugar-free version of Red Vines, as well as new flavors including apple, lime, and lemonade. (Source: www.encyclopedia.com)

RED

In 2003 Red Vines packaging was updated, and the company added new products including Neon Punch and Sour Punch Omegas. During the year a joint venture called Imagination Confections was formed with Ferrara Pan, New England Confectionary, Spangler, and molded chocolate maker R. M. Palmer to make candies based on characters licensed from the Walt Disney Company, which would start with a Winnie the Pooh line the following Easter. Industry magazine.

Top seller Red Vines continued to be made at Union City in a traditional batch process that took three days and gave the candy a softer, chewier texture that helped it remain distinctive from its competitors. Manufacturing of the 1,100 miles of candy produced each day began with corn syrup and wheat flour that were loaded from trains into seven silos, from which they were electronically pumped into kettles where flavoring and coloring were added by workers. After several hours’ cooking at 190 degrees, the dough was pumped into covered cans, where it cooled for 12 hours before running through extruders to create ropes and vines, which were twisted, cut into proper lengths, and then dried and packaged for final shipment to stores. Approximately 250 tons of Red Vines were produced each week. (Source: www.encyclopedia.com)

 

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