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ALiatris Pilosa

ALiatris Pilosa

Liatris Pilosa

Grass-leaf blazing-star is a beautiful and graceful plant for the perennial border and native meadow garden. One of the many highly attractive Liatris species, grass-leaf blazing-star blooms from mid-August to mid-October with slender ascending wands of purple flowers. Its narrow foliage is unobtrusive among grasses in a meadow. Grass-leaf blazing-star does well in nutrient poor to average soils, and grows in full sun to filtered shade conditions. It mixes beautifully among native grasses such as Schizachyrium scoparium, Andropogon virginicus, Muhlenbergia capillaris, and Sporobolus heterolepis. It also grows well with perennials such as Chrysopsis mariana, Rudbeckia fulgida, and Coreopsis verticillata.

Liatris

Blazing Stars (also called Gayfeathers) of the Liatris genus have general characteristics of: Stem leaves narrow and lance shaped; the flower heads, typically numbering 5 to 60 (but 160+ on a few species) appear on a spike, each flowerhead containing a number of small tubular 5-lobed pink-purple florets. Local variations in species populations will be observed. Rootstocks are corms and rhizomes.Names: The genus Liatris is an old name whose meaning has been lost. The species pilosa, means 'covered with soft hair' and refers to the hair of the corolla of the flower and sometimes on the stem. The author names for the plant classification are - first to classify was ‘Aiton’ which is for William Aiton (1731-1793), Scottish botanist who succeeded Philip Miller as superintendent of the Chelsea Physic Garden and then became director of Kew Gardens, where he published Hortus Kewensis, the Garden’s catalogue of plants. His work on this species was updated by ‘Willd.’ who was Carl Ludwig Willdenow (1765-1812), German botanist, a founder of the study of the geographic distribution of plants. He was director and curator of the Botanic Garden of Berlin.

Blazing Stars (also called Gayfeathers) of the Liatris genus have general characteristics of: Stem leaves narrow and lance shaped; the flower heads, typically numbering 5 to 60 (but 160+ on a few species) appear on a spike, each flowerhead containing a number of small tubular 5-lobed pink-purple florets. Local variations in species populations will be observed. Rootstocks are corms and rhizomes.Grass-leaf blazing-star is a beautiful and graceful plant for the perennial border and native meadow garden. One of the many highly attractive Liatris species, grass-leaf blazing-star blooms from mid-August to mid-October with slender ascending wands of purple flowers. Its narrow foliage is unobtrusive among grasses in a meadow. Grass-leaf blazing-star does well in nutrient poor to average soils, and grows in full sun to filtered shade conditions. It mixes beautifully among native grasses such as Schizachyrium scoparium, Andropogon virginicus, Muhlenbergia capillaris, and Sporobolus heterolepis. It also grows well with perennials such as Chrysopsis mariana, Rudbeckia fulgida, and Coreopsis verticillata. (Source: mtcubacenter.org)

 

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