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AKrigia Biflora

AKrigia Biflora

Krigia Biflora

Krigia biflora is an erect perennial growing 450–800 mm (18–31 in) tall. One plant can have 20 or more flower heads, very often two per flower stalk, each head with 25–60 yellow to orange-yellow ray flowers about 25–40 mm (1–1+1⁄2 in) across. There are no disc flowers. It can be an aggressively spreading plant. It grows in a variety of habitats and soils and blooms in late spring to late summer. The name of the plant consists of two words: Krigia for David Krieg, the German physician who first collected this plant in Maryland; and biflora, meaning two-flowered.Krigia biflora, also known as two-flower cynthia or two-flower dwarf dandelion, is a species of plant in the sunflower family. It is native to North America, where it is found in central Canada (Manitoba and Ontario) and in the eastern, central, and southwestern United States.

Biflora

Krigia biflora is known from the Eastern deciduous forest biome, tallgrass prairie, Rocky Mountain forest, and Madrean woodlands. It appears to spread clonally by adventitious buds on the roots. It is related to the more leafy-stemmed, freely branching K. montana (K. J. Kim and B. L. Turner 1992); their habital differences are less clear where they are sympatric in the southern Appalachians. An alloploid hybrid between them has become established (see 3. K. montana).Woodland wildflowers get most of the attention in spring, but there are pretty things to find in sunny meadows too, including two-flowered Cynthia (Krigia biflora). Low, sparse rosettes of pale green to gray-green leaves send up slender, 1- to 2-foot stems that branch toward the top, with radial heads of ray florets. From a distance, it looks much like a dandelion (as indicated by its other common name: two-flowered dwarf dandelion) but the color is slightly more on the orange side. Despite the “two-flowered” reference, each plant usually produces several flowers. Here in southeastern PA, it blooms through May into early June.

Perennials, 10-70 cm; caudices stout, fibrous-rooted (sometimes propagating by adventitious buds on roots). Stems 1-5+, erect, scapiform, eglandular or glandular-villous distally. Leaves mostly basal (rosettes), some cauline (proximal); petioles ± winged; blades oblance-olate to obovate or spatulate, 5-25 cm, margins entire or remotely dentate to pinnately lobed, lobes narrow to bluntly triangular or rounded, apices acute to obtuse or rounded, faces glabrous. eglandular (usually glaucous); cauline 1-4, sessile, lanceolate, bases sheathing or auriculate-clasping, usually entire, distalmost sometimes reduced, bractlike. Heads (2-)3-20+. Peduncles usually in groups of 2-6 from axils of single or paired distal cauline bracts. Involucres 7-11 mm. Phyllaries 8-18, reflexed in fruit. lanceolate, midveins obscure, apices acute, faces glabrous. Florets 25-60; corollas orange or yellow-orange, 15-25 mm. Cypselae reddish brown, columnar, 2-2.5 mm, 12-15-ribbed; pappi of ca. 10 outer scales 0.3-0.5 mm plus 20-40, barbellulate inner bristles 4.5-5.5 mm. 2n = 10, 20. Flowering Apr-Aug. Sandy, loam, or humus soils, shaded mixed mesophytic, beach-maple, oak-pine, and oak-hickory woods. often near streams, meadows, moist prairies, and Madrean woodlands; 10-2300 m; Man., Ont.; Ala., Ariz., Ark.. Colo., Conn., Del., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Pa., R.I., Tenn., Va., W.Va., Wis. Krigia biflora is known from the Eastern deciduous forest biome, tallgrass prairie, Rocky Mountain forest, and Madrean woodlands. It appears to spread clonally by adventitious buds on the roots. It is related to the more leafy-stemmed, freely branching K. montana (K. J. Kim and B. L. Turner 1992); their habital differences are less clear where they are sympatric in the southern Appalachians. An alloploid hybrid between them has become established (see 3. K. montana). (Source: swbiodiversity.org)

 

 

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