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Agrimonyor

Agrimonyor

Agrimony

Agrimony (Agrimonia longifolia) is a mint plant of picturesque appearance that has been used for centuries as a medicinal herb in America. Animal studies showed that extract of Agrimonia can provide protection against laboratory-induced oxidative damage, a destructive process in the body. But the effects of this mint have been mostly studied on the properties providing antioxidant benefits. In the recent past, Agrimony has been studied to provide protection against the dopamine-mediated reward system and obesity.When taken by mouth: Agrimony is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when used short-term. Traditionally, agrimony herb seems to be safe in doses of 3 grams daily. Also, taking agrimony extract seems to be safe in doses of 160 mg daily. But large amounts of agrimony are POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Agrimony contains chemicals called tannins. In large amounts, tannins may cause side effects such as stomach irritation, nausea, vomiting, and liver injury. Large amounts of tannins might also increase the risk of certain cancers. But these side effects have not been reported with agrimony.

Agrimony

When applied to the skin: Agrimony is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when used short-term. But applying large amounts of agrimony is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Agrimony contains chemicals called tannins. There is concern that tannins might cause serious side effects if absorbed through the skin in large amounts. But these serious side effects have not been reported with agrimony. However, agrimony can make some people's skin extra sensitive to sunlight and more likely to burn.The appropriate dose of agrimony depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for agrimony. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

The small, stalkless yellow flowers are borne in a long terminal spike. The fruit is about 0.6 cm (0.2 inch) in diameter and bears a number of hooks that enable it to cling easily to clothing or the coat of an animal.Agrimone, Agrimonia, Agrimonia eupatoria, Aigremoine, Aigremoine Eupatoire, Church Steeples, Churchsteeples, Cockeburr, Cocklebur, Common Agrimony, Da Hua Long Ya Cao, Eupatoire-des-Anciens, Fragrant Agrimony, Francormier, Herba Agrimoniae, Herbe-de-Saint-Guillaume, Herbe de Sainte Madeleine, Philanthropos, Soubeirette, Sticklewort, Thé des Bois, Thé du Nord, Toute-Bonne. A skin condition called cutaneous porphyria. People with cutaneous porphyria accumulate a chemical called porphyrin in their skin. Porphyrin makes the skin especially sensitive to sunlight. Early research suggests that taking a crushed agrimony solution by mouth 3-4 times daily reduces the formation of sores on skin exposed to sunlight in people with cutaneous porphyria. (Source: www.emedicinehealth.com)

 

 

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