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AFalse Sunflower Plant

AFalse Sunflower Plant

False Sunflower Plant

False sunflowers are clump-forming and tend to stay in one place, rather than spreading throughout the garden. Dividing your plants every two to three years will keep the clumps from dying in the center. You can do this in either the spring or fall. Moreover, many varieties can get top-heavy and require staking. You also can prune or pinch them back in mid-spring for a shorter, sturdier plant. However, doing this will delay blooming for a couple of weeks.

SPREAD

The tiny corollas of both the ray florets and disk florets are short-tubular in shape, deep golden yellow to orange-yellow, and 5-lobed; the corolla lobes of these florets are triangular in shape and spreading to recurved. Both the ray florets and disk florets of the flowerheads are fertile. At the base of each flowerhead, there are several outer phyllaries (floral bracts) that are arranged in a single series. These phyllaries are light to medium green, more or less pubescent, and oblong-ovate in shape, tapering abruptly to blunt tips that are somewhat recurved. There are also several inner phyllaries that are arranged in a single series. These phyllaries are similar to the outer phyllaries, but their tips are appressed along the base of the flowerhead, rather than recurved. The peduncles of the flowerheads are 1-6" long, light green, terete to slightly angular, and more or less pubescent. The blooming period occurs from early summer to late summer, lasting about 2-3 months for a colony of plants. Afterwards, the florets are replaced by achenes that are 4-5 mm. long, oblongoid-oblanceoloid in shape, somewhat flattened, and dark-colored. These achenes lack tufts of hair, nor do they have significant scales at their apices. The root system is fibrous.A clump-forming, spreading, branched, sunflower-like, short-lived perennial of variable height. Flowerheads about 2 inches across, distinctly orange-yellow when young, fading to light yellow; rays 8–15, usually 10. Blooms May–September. Leaves opposite on long petioles, broadly ovate to nearly triangular, without hair; with large, regular teeth. Seeds angular, while those of Helianthus species are flat.

False sunflowers are clump-forming and tend to stay in one place, rather than spreading throughout the garden. Dividing your plants every two to three years will keep the clumps from dying in the center. You can do this in either the spring or fall. Moreover, many varieties can get top-heavy and require staking. You also can prune or pinch them back in mid-spring for a shorter, sturdier plant. However, doing this will delay blooming for a couple of weeks.These plants prefer full sun to grow and bloom their best. They can tolerate light shade, though blooming might not be as vigorous and the stems might be floppy and require support. Plus, they can get leggy if they don't get at least four to five hours of sun per day. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

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