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ADwarf Iris Flower

ADwarf Iris Flower

Dwarf Iris Flower

It’s easy to spot a dwarf iris flower today because its floral cups are dwarfed by its large leaves. It also has smaller flowers, which makes for a less conspicuous bloom.A native of Turkey and the Caucasian Mountains, Dwarf Iris (Iris reticulata) is a four-inch tall beauty (10 cm) with grass-like leaves and a violet-blue or purple flower with yellow markings that bursts into bloom in late winter to early spring to create an effect reminiscent of butterflies hovering low to the ground. This sight brightens the aspect of late winter days! Breeders have been creating terrific cultivars with flower colors ranging from yellow and chocolate to speckled blues.

Iris

Iris 'Cantab' is a gorgeous Dwarf Iris with soft, pale blue flowers and dark blue falls, beautifully adorned with white stripes around a yellow blotch. The foliage of slender, grass like, gray-green leaves typically rises to the same level as the flower, but does not elongate after flowering, making this Iris reticulata idea for pots and containers. Blooming in late winter to early spring, these pretty flowers (usually 1-2 per bulb) are rich of a sweet fragrance.A well-deserved name for this exquisite Dwarf Iris, Iris 'Eye-Catcher' produces large, pristine white flowers, strikingly adorned with rich blue markings and a brilliant yellow crest onto each fall.

The foliage of slender, grass like, gray-green leaves typically rises to the same level as the flower, but elongates after flowering, before disappearing by late spring as the plant goes dormant. Blooming in late winter to early spring, the bulbs quickly produce offsets that multiply into generous drifts of color.Iris 'Gordon' is a pretty Dwarf Iris with light blue flowers, beautifully adorned with a striking deep velvet falls and a golden-orange blotch edged in white on each fall. The foliage of slender, grass like, gray-green leaves typically rises to the same level as the flower, but elongates after flowering, before disappearing by late spring as the plant goes dormant. Blooming in late winter to early spring, the bulbs quickly produce offsets that multiply into generous drifts of color. (Source: www.gardenia.net)

 

 

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