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ABurning Weed Plant

ABurning Weed Plant

Burning Weed Plant

Nutrient burn can cause root damage, but the most obvious and most significant damage happens at the leaves. That’s because the browned, scorched areas of leaves suffering from nutrient burn can’t be used to absorb light, and in turn, can’t contribute to the photosynthesis that keeps the plant alive and healthy. That’s why it’s so important for growers to understand that nutrients are just one part of a balanced system, and that trying to force growth through over-fertilizing actually hinders growth by throwing the system out of whack.

Plant

The first step in remedying nutrient burn is to say goodbye to the parts of the plant that have already been affected. Nutrient burn can’t be reversed, and any leaves or buds that have already yellowed or browned are never going to be green again. Snipping off any damaged leaves and buds will prevent parts of the plant that have already been injured or died from rotting and causing further headaches.In a hydroponic environment, growers should dial back the concentration of their fertilizers. If using prepackaged mixtures, growers can over dilute their solution to a lower level than the manufacturer’s recommendation. Growers mixing nutrients by hand should employ an EC meter to ensure that their mixtures haven’t been accidentally over concentrated and that EC levels fall in line with what their previously nute-burned plants need

Mineral-based nutrients can help increase cannabis growth rates and yields compared to organic-based nutrients due to the fact that these nutrients are so easily absorbed by the plant roots. The plant doesn’t have to do any “work” to get the nutrients. The downside is your plant can easily take in more than it can use if the nutrient levels are too high. Burning nettle is a small to medium-size summer annual broadleaf weed common in gardens. The first new seed leaves, or cotyledons, are bright green, notched at the tips, but smooth along the edges. The first true leaves have serrated margins, and occur opposite each other on the stalk. The leaf blade and the stalk have both stinging and nonstinging hairs. Mature plants can be 5 inches to 2 feet tall. Plants are slender and upright with sparse, four-angled stems. Stinging hairs on stems and leaves are long. Shorter nonstinging hairs may also be present. The two opposite, stalked leaves have toothed margins and are 1/2 to 2 inches long with 3 to 5 veins radiating from the base. Flowers are about 2/5 of an inch long and greenish white. The plant contains both male and female flowers that occur in the same cluster. Fruits are small (1/16 to 1/10 of an inch), triangular, with one seed. (Source: ipm.ucanr.edu)

 

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