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ABrome Fields

ABrome Fields

Brome Fields

Brome Bird Care, located in Knowlton, Quebec, Canada, is home to the Squirrel Buster® brand of squirrel proof bird feeders. Led by its founder, Paul Cote, and supported by an impressive list of patents, Squirrel Buster® feeders have come to be recognized as the leaders in the squirrel proof category. Brome Bird Care, located in Knowlton, Quebec, Canada, is home to the Squirrel Buster® brand of squirrel proof bird feeders. Led by its founder, Paul Cote, and supported by an impressive list of patents, Squirrel Buster® feeders have come to be recognized as the leaders in the squirrel proofcategory.

Brome

Bromus is distinguished from other grass genera by a combination of several morphological characteristics, including leaf sheaths that are closed (connate) for most of their length, awns that are usually inserted subapically, and hairy appendages on the ovary. The leaf blades and sheaths, which comprise the leaves can be hairless, sparsely hairy or hairy. The inflorescence is a dense or open panicle, usually drooping or nodding, sometimes spreading (as in Japanese brome, B. japonicus). The Tarahumara Indians in northern Mexico use the grains of some native Bromus species to aid fermentation in making one of their cultural beverages. As names like poverty brome (B. sterilis) and ripgut brome (B. diandrus) attest, some species are not very useful as fodder because their leaves sclerotize quickly and may even be harmful to livestock due to the high silica content. Others, such as meadow brome (Bromus riparius), native to parts of Russia, are planted as forage in the Great Plains of North America. Brome grasses are not usually grown as ornamental plants due to most species' nondescript appearance. Some are useful to prevent erosion but such use must be cautiously controlled as most Bromus have the ability to spread, becoming invasive weeds. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is a particularly troublesome weed across much of western North America (from southern British Columbia to California.

Smooth brome was introduced from Europe and has been used in range seedings in many areas of the country. Smooth brome is a good forage producer on the mountain loam sites, and it is also adapted to the upland sites. In the lower rainfall areas, some irrigation is required for optimum production. The elevation range for this grass varies from 3,000 to 12,000 feet. Smooth brome comes on fairly early in the spring, but is not as early as intermediate wheatgrass with which it compares very closely in its adaptations.Reduced tillage practices that retain surface residue create a favorable environment for downy brome in fall-seeded crops. Crop rotation with spring-planted crops helps control downy brome in winter wheat cropping systems. Because downy brome is a winter annual, seedbed preparation for a spring-planted crop will destroy the previous year’s seedlings, and relatively few new seedlings will germinate in the spring crop. Similarly, delaying planting of fall-sown crops allows more time for downy brome to germinate, so that more seedlings are destroyed during seedbed preparation and density is reduced in the subsequent crop. Dryland crop rotations that include summer fallow should be cultivated after wheat harvest or should begin early enough in the spring of the fallow year to prevent seed set. (Source: www.sare.org)

 

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