FutureStarr

AA Tartine Los Angeles

AA Tartine Los Angeles

Tartine Los Angeles

Tartine’s goal is to create an authentic, artisan bakery experience with a team of friendly, helpful employees, a wide selection of pastries, sandwiches, and daily made breads and breakfast treats. This specific vision was developed by founders Lawrence + Nicola and opened in Wilshire Blvd in Los Angeles in 2001.

Food

via GIPHY

Earlier this year in the sunny Tartine market area at the Row in Downtown Los Angeles, I picked up a hand-thrown ceramic cup to admire it. It was just one small moment inside a massive joint Tartine and Chris Bianco (the Phoenix Italian food star) operation that spans some 40,000 square feet and two floors of wholesale and retail space. The market area sells Bianco’s own canned tomatoes and $6 pastries and lots of cups and other kitchen tools, while the Tartine Bianco just beyond had a bar area (with its own menu), a dining area (different menu), and access to Alameda Supper Club (a whole other restaurant, still) just beyond.

There’s a certain formula I like to call the Bestia Rule that founders Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis created when they opened their incredibly successful restaurant seven years ago in Downtown LA. If you build a phenomenal restaurant with a killer vibe in a high-ceiling Downtown warehouse-looking space, Angelenos will come. To expand on that, the food needs to offer bold flavors that stand out, serve dishes that you can’t find elsewhere like tableside smoked short ribs or dry-aged duck kebabs, and ensure there’s a vibrant big-city energy in the dining room every night. You need all of those elements, and restaurants like Nightshade, Rossoblu, Bavel, and Majordomo have followed this formula to success.

LA diners have no problem schlepping over to Downtown’s traffic-riddled streets for a great meal. I think the issues I saw with the now-closed Tartine Bianco and Alameda Supper Club restaurants is that they both had solid ambiences, but nothing to write home about, with its minimalist, semi-industrial design. Tartine Bianco especially tried to follow the Bestia Rule with its sweeping square-shaped dining room offering few soft surfaces or anything of visual interest outside of its factory-like windows. Alameda Supper Club felt more intimate, with well-executed but familiar food like handmade ravioli and grilled vegetables.

The success of Tartine’s original San Francisco location is arguably one of the reasons that SF gained a reputation as a place where people would wait in line for any sort of “cult” food item. I’ve written countless city guides since Tartine’s launch in 2002, and every time the bakery or its offerings was mentioned, commenters would complain about the lengthy wait they face at the spot. It became a self-perpetuating myth: The same long lines that might dissuade you from, say, stopping at a place for lunch are what started to attract people to Tartine (because people willing to wait 45 minutes for a pastry can’t be wrong, right?) And with that, lines became even longer. (Source:

A creative cocktail list includes cheekily named drinks like the Granita Applebum (made with mezcal, cranberry agrodolce, lemon, and frozen glühwein), as well as spiked house-made seasonal ferments like kombucha and kefir. The wine list is also stellar, with selections from sommelier Taylor Parsons that pair perfectly with the California bistro fare. Main event: the food. Give us the lowdown—especially what not to miss.

The downtown Los Angeles outpost for Tartine's Manufactory — a food emporium that included two restaurants, a marketplace selling baked goods and prepared foods, a takeout window and a coffee roastery — shuttered Monday, less than a year after opening.

The downtown Los Angeles outpost for Tartine's Manufactory — a food emporium that included two restaurants, a marketplace selling baked goods and prepared foods, a takeout window and a coffee roastery — shuttered Monday, less than a year after opening.

The wholesale bakery operation, which supplies Tartine's cafe in Hollywood and Southern California Whole Foods stores, is all that remains in the 40,000-square-foot space in the so-called ROW DTLA development, a row of six historic buildings converted into boutiques, restaurants and creative working spaces.

 

 

Related Articles