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Wild Garlic Bulbs or

Wild Garlic Bulbs or

Wild Garlic Bulbs

Welcome to the extensive range of bulbs from Philips Lighting. It covers LED, halogen and fluorescent bulbs for your home, office, car and more. They come in an impressive variety of shapes, styles and fittings. Whether you want to create the perfect atmosphere for your living space, energise your work area, explore how colour adds ambiance, complement your decor or simply save energy and reduce household bills, there's something for you. And it doesn’t have to be a challenge to find what’s best for you, because we’ve launched the Bulb Advisor. It's fun and easy to use, and ensures you always choose the right bulb for your needs. Feel yourself at home with the latest Philips LED technology. Philips LED light makes sure that you feel at home as soon as the lights are switched on. LED light bulbs combine a beautiful warm white light with an exceptionally long lifetime. LED bulbs provide immediate, significant energy savings while enhancing your home atmosphere.

Bulb

via GIPHY

bulb, in botany, a modified stem that is the resting stage of certain seed plants, particularly perennial monocotyledons. A bulb consists of a relatively large, usually globe-shaped, underground bud with membraneous or fleshy overlapping leaves arising from a short stem. A bulb’s fleshy leaves—which in some species are actually expanded leaf bases—function as food reserves that enable a plant to lie dormant when water is unavailable (during winter or drought) and resume its active growth when favourable conditions again prevail. Bulbs enable many common garden ornamentals, such as the narcissus, tulip, and hyacinth, to produce their flowers rapidly, almost precociously, in early spring when growing conditions are favourable. Other bulb-producing plants, such as the lilies, flower in the summer, while a few, such as the meadow saffron, bloom in the fall.

Bulb-producing species are especially abundant in the lily (Liliaceae) and amaryllis (Amaryllidaceae) families. A few bulb-producing species are of economic importance to humans because of the taste and nutritive value of their fleshy leaves; included among such species are the onion and its relatives the shallot, garlic, and leek. Other bulbs contain poisonous compounds—such as the red squill (Drimia), the bulbs of which are the source of a highly effective rat poison.The bulb's leaf bases, also known as scales, generally do not support leaves, but contain food reserves to enable the plant to survive adverse conditions. At the center of the bulb is a vegetative growing point or an unexpanded flowering shoot. The base is formed by a reduced stem, and plant growth occurs from this basal plate. Roots emerge from the underside of the base, and new stems and leaves from the upper side. Tunicate bulbs have dry, membranous outer scales that protect the continuous lamina of fleshBulbous plant species cycle through vegetative and reproductive growth stages; the bulb grows to flowering size during the vegetative stage and the plant flowers during the reproductive stage. Certain environmental conditions are needed to trigger the transition from one stage to the next, such as the shift from a cold winter to spring.(Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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