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White Vervain

White Vervain

White Vervain

White Vervain is a common plant in the eastern and central United States, found in woodland edges, old fields, pastures, roadsides, and disturbed areas. It has a botanical name, urticifolia, referring to the resemblance it has to another common plant, nettle (Urtica spp. ). The interesting dusty gray color of dormant plants offer a contrast to the fall prairie browns, golds and reds (see photo above).White Vervain is a common plant in the eastern and central United States, found in woodland edges, old fields, pastures, roadsides, and disturbed areas. Its botanical name, urticifolia, refers to the resemblance it has to another common plant, nettle (Urtica spp.). The interesting dusty gray color of dormant plants offer a contrast to the fall prairie browns, golds and reds (see photo above)

Plant

Although sometimes considered a “weed,” this native plant has high ecological value for wildlife. The inconspicuous white flowers are a nectar source for short and long-tongued bees, wasps, butterflies, and flies, and the plant is eaten by the larvae of Crambodes talidiformis (Verbena Moth), Longitarsus suspectus (Flea Beetle), larvae of Clinodiplosis verbenae (Vervain Leaf Midge), Macrosiphum verbenae (Verbena Aphid), and Melanoplus bivittatus (Two-striped Grasshopper). But insects aren’t the only ones feasting on this plant – the seeds are also consumed by songbirds.Each species is different, so be sure to check the GERMINATION CODE listed on the website, in the catalog, or on your seed packet. Then, follow the GERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS prior to planting.

Some species don't need any pre-treatment to germinate, but some species have dormancy mechanisms that must be broken before the seed will germinate. Some dormancy can be broken in a few minutes, but some species take months or even years.We dig plants when they are dormant from our outdoor beds and ship them April-May and October. Some species go dormant in the summer and we can ship them July/August. We are among the few still employing this production method, which is labor intensive but plant-friendly. They arrive to you dormant, with little to no top-growth (bare-root), packed in peat moss. They should be planted as soon as possible. Unlike greenhouse-grown plants, bare-root plants can be planted during cold weather or anytime the soil is not frozen. A root photo is included with each species to illustrate the optimal depth and orientation. Planting instructions/care are also included with each order. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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