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What Causes a Seizureor

What Causes a Seizureor

What Causes a Seizure

Your memories of a seizure may be vivid—or hazy. You may recall a feeling of heat or a sensation of being on fire. Does the person who has a seizure remember or feel any of this?

Seizure

The brain consists of nerve cells that communicate with each other through electrical activity. A seizure occurs when one or more parts of the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals that interrupt normal brain signals. Anything that interrupts the normal connections between nerve cells in the brain can cause a seizure. This includes a high fever, high or low blood sugar, alcohol or drug withdrawal, or a brain concussion. But when a person has 2 or more seizures with no known cause, this is diagnosed as epilepsy.

Focal seizures take place when abnormal electrical brain function occurs in one or more areas of one side of the brain. Before a focal seizure, you may have an aura, or signs that a seizure is about to occur. This is more common with a complex focal seizure. The most common aura involves feelings, such as deja vu, impending doom, fear, or euphoria. Or you may have visual changes, hearing abnormalities, or changes in your sense of smell. The 2 types of focal seizures include: (Source: www.hopkinsmedicine.org)

Causes

This type of seizure often occurs in the area of the brain that controls emotion and memory function (temporal lobe). You will likely lose consciousness. This may not mean you pass out. You may just stop being aware of what's going on around you. You may look awake, but have a variety of unusual behaviors. These may range from gagging, lip smacking, running, screaming, crying, or laughing. You may be tired or sleepy after the seizure. This is called the postictal period.

This is also called grand mal seizure. The classic form of this kind of seizure has 5 distinct phases. Your body, arms, and legs will flex (contract), extend (straighten out), and tremor (shake). This is followed by contraction and relaxation of the muscles (clonic period) and the postictal period. During the postictal period, you may be sleepy. You may have problems with vision or speech, and may have a bad headache, fatigue, or body aches. Not all of these phases occur in everyone with this type of seizure. (Source: www.hopkinsmedicine.org)

 

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