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Western Conefloweror

Western Conefloweror

Western Coneflower

Purple Coneflower is an herbaceous perennial in the Asteraceae (daisy) family that is native to central and eastern USA. It may grow 3 to 4 feet tall and produce pinkish-purple flowers that mature in early summer through mid-fall. Many cultivars are available for varied sizes and colors. Several pollinators are attracted to the flower, especially butterflies. Leave some of the flower heads on to produce seeds for the birds.

Coneflower

For the most part, coneflowers have very few problems. As long as the plants are given plenty of room for good air circulation, they should not be bothered by fungal diseases. If you see mildew or spots on the leaves, simply cut them back and let them fill in on their own. A few pests enjoy coneflowers, so keep an eye out for Japanese beetles, #purple#drought tolerant#perennials#white flowers#wildlife plant#purple flowers#pink flowers#red flowers#native perennials#salt tolerant#tough plant#low maintenance#apvg#food source wildlife#cpp#fire medium flammability#NC native#summer flowers#children's garden#playground plant#naturalizes#pollinator plant#native wildflower#fantz#flowers late spring#larval host plant#food source summer#food source fall#NC Native Pollinator Plant#food source nectar#food source pollen#food source hard mast fruit#butterfly friendly#nectar plant early summer#nectar plant mid-summer#nectar plant late summer#HS302#apvg-p#pollinator garden#bee friendly#Audubon#wavy-lined emerald butterfly#silvery checkerspot butterfly#stormwater demo garden orange

Its flowers are attractive to bees, butterflies and other pollinators. This plant supports Silvery Checkerspot (Chlosyne nycteis) larvae which has two broods from May-September. The adults feed on nectar from red clover, common milkweed, and dogbane. This plant also supports Wavy-lined Emerald (Synchlora aerata) larvae. Songbirds, especially American goldfinches, eat the seeds. Slightly deer resistant.The leaves feel like fine sandpaper on both surfaces and are toothless or nearly so. Basal and lower stem leaves are mostly arrowhead to narrowly heart-shaped, to 4 inches long and 1¾ inches wide, pointed or blunt at the tip, and abruptly narrowing at the base to a long “winged” stalk. Leaves quickly lose this shape as they ascend the stem, becoming more lance-linear or elliptic with broadly winged stalks, and are reduced to stalkless bracts in the flower clusters. Basal leaves often wither away by flowering time and have very narrowly winged stalks, or lack wings altogether. Stems are single or multiple from the base, mostly erect, branched in the upper plant, rough-textured in the upper plant, and green or red. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

 

 

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