FutureStarr

Vetch Plant

Vetch Plant

Vetch Plant

Have you ever been in the market for a flowering plant, like a begonia, but had a hard time finding one? It’s a common problem, because begonias are often hard to identify in the wild. But now, growers have a natural option: the vench plant.fava bean (Vicia faba) is an important food crop, and several other species of vetch are cultivated as fodder and cover crops and as green manure. Like other legumes, they add nitrogen to the soil by means of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and thus are particularly valuable as a soil-enriching crop. For the low-growing ground cover Securigera varia, see crown vetch.

Vetch

Global demand for protein is predicted to increase by 50% by 2050. To meet the increasing demand whilst ensuring sustainability, protein sources that generate low-greenhouse gas emissions are required, and protein-rich legume seeds have the potential to make a significant contribution. Legumes like common vetch (Vicia sativa) that grow in marginal cropping zones and are drought tolerant and resilient to changeable annual weather patterns, will be in high demand as the climate changes. In common vetch, the inability to eliminate the γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-alanine (GBCA) toxin present in the seed has hindered its utility as a human and animal food for many decades, leaving this highly resilient species an “orphan” legume.

However, the availability of the vetch genome and transcriptome data together with the application of CRISPR-Cas genome editing technologies lay the foundations to eliminate the GBCA toxin constraint. In the near future, we anticipate that a zero-toxin vetch variety will become a significant contributor to global protein demand. Common vetch (V. sativa) which is shown in Figure 1 belongs to the Fabaceae (legume) family, within the genus Vicia. This genus contains about 140 species including woolly-pod vetch (V. villosa) and faba bean (V. faba). Other Fabaceae genera also contain so-called vetches; of which two examples are Astragalus (containing the milkvetches) and Lathyrus (containing L. ochrus, the cyprus-vetch). Nowadays, common vetch is commonly found both in natural and agricultural settings across Europe, Asia, North America, some parts of South America, Africa, the Mediterranean, and Australia (Navrátilová et al., 2003; Ford et al., 2008). (Source: www.frontiersin.org)

 

 

Related Articles