FutureStarr

Vervine Plant

Vervine Plant

Vervine Plant

I thought I was going to die. The three months I spent waiting for a savior who wasn’t coming had been one exhausting barrage of false hopes, scraping for money and finding handouts, and the toughest moments were pushed aside by the little comforts new relationships and worry-free routines enticed.also known as vervain or verveine, is a genus in the family Verbenaceae. It contains about 150 species of annual and perennial herbaceous or semi-woody flowering plants. The majority of the species are native to the Americas and Asia; however, Verbena officinalis, the common vervain or common verbena, is the type species, and native to Europe. Verbena is an herbaceous flowering plant, belonging to the Verbenaceae family, and may be annual or perennial depending on the species. The leaves are usually opposite, simple, and in many species hairy, often densely so. The flowers are small, with five petals, and borne in dense spikes. Typically some shade of blue, they may also be white, pink, or purple, especially in cultivars.

Plant

Vervain is also known as American Blue Vervain and Simpler's Joy. This plant is in the Plant Family Verbenacea, but not to be confused with Lemon Verbena (Aloysia triphylla). These are two different plants only belonging to the same Plant Family. Vervain is indigenous to the United States growing naturally along roadsides and tall grassy fields flowering between June and September. It is a tall (3-4 feet), slender, elegant, perennial plant with opposing leaves which are lobed and serrated in shape and have small purplish-blue flowers. Historically it was listed for use by King's American Dispensatory as, tonic, emetic, expectorant, and sudorific. A Sudorific is a substance that causes or increases sweating. It is a plant that is overlooked by modern herbalists, but one that deserves renewed interest for its versatile influences on numerous systems.Deepak M, Handa SS. Antiinflammatory activity and chemical composition of extracts of Verbena officinalis. Phytother Res 2000;14:463-5. 2.) Carnat, A., Carnat, A. P., Chavignon, O., Heitz, A., Wylde, R., and Lamaison, J.

L. Luteolin 7-diglucuronide, the major flavonoid compound from Aloysia triphylla and Verbena officinalis. Planta Med 1995;61(5):490.3.) Guarrera, P. M., Forti, G., and Marignoli, S. Ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal uses of plants in the district of Acquapendente (Latium, Central Italy). J Ethnopharmacol. 1-15-2005;96(3):429-444.4.) Lai, SW, Yu, MS, Yuen, WH and Change, RC. Novel Neuroprotective Effects of the Aqueous Extracts from Verbena officinalis Linn. Neuropharmacology 50(6), pp 641-50, 2006.Vervain, or verbena as it can be known, is native to South East Europe and was likely introduced here in Neolithic times, so has been long naturalised. It was widely cultivated as a medicinal herb in medieval gardens and has escaped often. It is a tall plant, with branching stems and clusters of small, purple flowers from June through to October. In the wild, it prefers chalky soils and can be seen on rough grassland, roadside verges, scrubby areas, coastal cliffs and waste ground. (Source: www.wildlifetrusts.org)

 

 

 

Related Articles