FutureStarr

Sundrop flower

Sundrop flower

Sundrop flower

Sundrop is a plant native to North America. It is a dainty, lily-like flower found in shady woods, fields, meadows and waste places. The flowers have a delicate, palatable scent and the petals are beautiful and distantly related to the evening primrose.Sundrops is a highly ornamental spreading perennial plant that is well suited for springtime color value in mixed perennial borders, on slopes and combined with other low water needy garden plantings. It commonly grows to 12 inches high and spreads 3-4 ft. across and is characterized by fine textured leaves and a dense habit. Colorful lemon yellow flowers cover this plant for 4-6 weeks during the spring for a bright display.

Plant

Trim to edge around borders or if it is growing too far into paths anytime of the year (D). Plants are usually evergreen year-round in our climate, but do look semi-dormant in the coldest part of the year. Branches may die back if there are cold nights with frost, but the plant will re-emerge when the weather warms up. Ideally, cut back plants hard, nearly to the ground, in early spring to stimulate vigorous new growth (10). Larger plantings can be sheared (S). If desired, planted can be lightly “tipped back” (lightly pruned at branch tips) when flowers fade to stimulate new growth and more abundant flowers (10).The sundrop flowers of the plant called Oenothera fruticosa are day flowering. The clusters of bright yellow blossoms start lighting up your garden in late spring, and you can expect bloom after blossom in quick succession for two months. After the blossoms die, the distinctive club-shaped seed capsules develop. Some cultivars reflower in autumn.

From Alaska to California, from France's Basque Country to Mexico's Pacific Coast, Teo Spengler has dug the soil, planted seeds and helped trees, flowers and veggies thrive. A professional writer and consummate gardener, Spengler has written about home and garden for Gardening Know How, San Francisco Chronicle, Gardening Guide and Go Banking Rates. She earned a BA from U.C. Santa Cruz, a law degree from U.C. Berkeley's Boalt Hall, and an MA and MFA from San Francisco State. She currently divides her life between San Francisco and southwestern France.For example, Oenothera biennis, Oenothera lamarckiana and some other species are commonly known as “Evening Primroses”. The name Evening Primrose refers to the habit of the plant to open its flowers only in the evening. Oenothera Mexicana is commonly called “Mexican Evening Primrose”. Oenothera fruticosa is also known as “Sundrops” or “Southern Sundrops”, while Oenothera elata is known by the common name “Hooker’s Evening Primrose” or “Tall Evening Primrose”. (Source: www.atozflowers.com)

 

 

Related Articles