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Snow on the mountain plant images

Snow on the mountain plant images

Snow on the mountain plant images

snow-on-the-mountain, (Euphorbia marginata), succulent plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to the central plains of the United States. The plants, which grow to a height of 60 cm (2 feet), have long, oval, light green foliage, with white-margined leaves near the top, where several white whorls of bracts (leaflike structures) are clustered. The plant has long been a favourite as a garden annual and in flower arrangements, though some people are allergic to its white latex sap.

Pant

snow-on-the-mountain, (Euphorbia marginata), succulent plant of the spurge family (Euphorbiaceae), native to the central plains of the United States. The plants, which grow to a height of 60 cm (2 feet), have long, oval, light green foliage, with white-margined leaves near the top, where several white whorls of bracts (leaflike structures) are clustered. The plant has long been a favourite as a garden annual and in flower arrangements, though some people are allergic to its white latex sap. The white sap of these plants has long been used to blister the skin or as an intestinal purgative. In most cases, livestock are poisoned by an acrid principle that severely irritates the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. This plant rarely causes death. Experimental feedings of this plant in Texas have shown that 100 ounces produces severe scours and weight loss in cattle, the latter persisting for several months.

Flat clusters at the tips of branching stems in the upper plant. Flower structures are about 3/8 inch across with mostly 5 white (sometimes 3 or 4), petal-like appendages, each having a green, oblong to kidney-shaped gland at the base. In the center are numerous, tiny male flowers with yellow-green stamens, surrounding a single green female flower with an arcing, divided style."Snow on the mountain" is a common name that applies to both the native Euphorbia marginata and to the variegated leaf form of the non-native and invasive Aegopodium podagraria. The first is an annual that is found in dry prairies and grows from seed each year. The second is a perennial with creeping rhizomes that will eventually smother everything else. Please don't plant that one. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

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