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Saint Johns Wart or

Saint Johns Wart or

Saint Johns Wart

People most commonly use St. John's wort for depression and mood disorders. There is some strong scientific evidence that it is effective for mild to moderate depression. St. John's wort is also used for symptoms of menopause and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these other uses.St. John's wort is named after John the Baptist. The plant usually begins to flower around the 24th of June, the feast day of St. John the Baptist. It contains many chemicals that act on messengers in the brain that regulate mood.

John

via GIPHY

People taking St. John's wort were also more likely to continue treatment, as the herb was associated with fewer adverse effects compared to tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI), a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant agents (NaSSAs).When used topically, St. John's wort may cause a skin rash. St. John’s wort (both oral or topical) can also increase the sensitivity of your skin and eyes to sunlight. If you have a condition such as lupus or are taking medication that can cause photosensitivity (such as some acne medications), review the risks and benefits of taking St. John's wort with your doctor or pharmacist.Taking St. John's wort with antidepressants or any substance that raises serotonin can cause serotonin syndrome, a potentially dangerous condition resulting from an excess of serotonin. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome include confusion, fever, hallucinations, nausea, loss of muscle coordination, sweating, and shakiness.According to several of these studies, St. John’s wort may be more effective than a placebo (sugar pill), and as effective as prescription antidepressants, in treating mild depression. Two studies in the United States found that St. John’s wort was no better than a placebo for treating moderate to severe depression.

St. John’s wort has been associated with very serious and potentially dangerous interactions with many common drugs. St. John’s wort can weaken how well other drugs work, including antidepressants, birth control pills, cyclosporine (an anti-rejection drug), digoxin (a heart drug), HIV drugs, cancer medications, and blood thinners such as Coumadin.St John's wort reproduces both vegetatively and sexually. Depending on environmental and climatic conditions, and rosette age, St John's wort will alter growth form and habit to promote survival. Summer rains are particularly effective in allowing the plant to grow vegetatively, following defoliation by insects or grazing.St John's wort has also been shown to cause drug interactions through the induction of the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter. Increased P-glycoprotein expression results in decreased absorption and increased clearance of certain drugs, leading to lower plasma concentrations and impaired clinical efficacy.While some studies and research reviews have supported the efficacy of St John's wort as a treatment for depression in humans, in the United States, it is not recommended as a replacement for more studied treatments, and it is advised that symptoms of depression warrant proper medical consultation. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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