FutureStarr

Mugwort near me

Mugwort near me

Mugwort near me

Mugwort grows in most of Europe and temperate Asia, but it is rare to find it where it doesn’t grow.The mugwort plant has been traditionally used for everything from digestive disorders to beer-making, insect repellent, and more. Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris L.) is a perennial plant in the Asteraceae family. The plant is native to Northern Europe, and Asia; it can also be found in many parts of North America.The aerial parts of the mugwort plant are used as an essential oil. The plant is also burned in moxibustion practices. In addition to its medicinal use, mugwort has been used for smudging, protection, and inducing vivid dreams (when placed underneath a person’s pillow).

Mugwort

The parts of the mugwort plant that grow aboveground are used to make essential oil, which is composed of several therapeutic chemicals (including camphor, pinene, and cineole). This chemical composition has diverse health-promoting properties including the plant’s antioxidant, antibacterial, and antifungal effects.There is not enough medical research data to prove—or disprove—the safety of mugwort. Mugwort is likely unsafe for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding. It may cause the uterus to contract, inducing miscarriage. Mugwort’s use has not been established as safe for infants.In a 2008 study, 87% of patients allergic to celery tested positive to mugwort pollen sensitization (by performing a skin test). The study found that 52% of those allergic to carrots tested positive for mugwort allergies, and 26% of the study participants who were known to be hypersensitive (allergic) to caraway seeds were allergic to mugwort.

When foraging for mugwort, it’s important to keep in mind that the leaves should be harvested before the flowers bloom. When harvesting mugwort for its essential oil content, the flowering tops of the plant should be collected when they initially bloom. This is when the flowers contain the most potent volatile oil content.There is also some concern that mugwort might cause allergic reactions in people with allergies to white mustard, honey, royal jelly, hazelnut, pine nuts, olive, latex, peach, kiwi, mango, the Micronesian nut called Nangai, and other plants from the genus Artemisia, including sage. Bauer L, Ebner C, Hirschwehr R, et al. IgE cross-reactivity between birch pollen, mugwort pollen, and celery is due to three distinct cross-reacting allergens: immunoblot investigation of the birch-mugwort-celery syndrome. Clin Exp Allergy 1996;26:1161-70. View abstract. (Source: www.webmd.com)

 

 

Related Articles