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Minnesota wildflowers

Minnesota wildflowers

Minnesota wildflowers

One of the sights to take in at the Minnesota State Fair is over 250 acres of prairie, which lines up with hundreds of different kinds of wildflowers. In this post, we explore 10 of the more interesting plants on display for the fair.Phyllis Root and Kelly Povo chronicle the ten years they spent exploring Minnesota’s woods, prairies, hillsides, lakes, and bogs for wildflowers, taking pictures and notes, gathering clues, mapping the way for fellow flower hunters. Featuring helpful tips, exquisite photographs, and the story of their own search as your guide, the authors place the waiting wonder of Minnesota’s wildflowers within easy reach.Once prairie grasses and flowers bloomed for hundreds of miles in the western part of what we now call Minnesota. Once tiny orchids grew among the roots of giant old pines, and fleeting blossoms sheltered in the shade of great maple and oak forests. These flowers that grew here for hundreds of years, though harder to find now, are still there, and this book shows you how to discover them.

Minnesota

This book is a treasure trove of plant lore and information, the perfect companion for anyone who wants to find—or simply to find out more about—shooting stars and kitten tails, prairie smoke and Dutchman’s breeches, blazing star and butterfly weed, and more native flowers than most Minnesotans imagine are blooming nearby.Readers of Searching for Minnesota’s Native Wildflowers will learn where to look for wildflowers and how to identify them, whether in the woods, wetlands, peatlands, or the prairie in spring, summer, or fall; around the state’s 10,000 (or so) lakes; on the North Shore; or, especially, in Minnesota’s many great state parks. Featuring helpful tips, exquisite photographs, and the story of their own search as your guide, Phyllis and Kelly place the waiting wonder of Minnesota’s wildflowers within easy reach.

It may get cold and snowy in Minnesota, but I'm absolutely in love with every season here. I ask nothing more in the summer than some warm sunshine and fields and fields of wild lupines. Though they prefer to grow next to creeks and streams, the ones I've seen have mostly been on top of the embankments or in fields (usually surrounded by forest.)This always reminds me of the Colorado Rockies, especially the Flatirons, since they're a reddish color (as are the rocks of the Rockies.) What a beautiful find out in the middle of nowhere in the forests of Northern Minnesota! Apparently they're not supposed to grow here, but they do (see image proof above!).The mission of Minnesota Wildflowers is to educate Minnesotans on our native plants, raise awareness on threats like invasive species, and inspire people to explore our great state, appreciate its natural heritage, and become involved in preserving it. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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