FutureStarr

Iris Seeds

Iris Seeds

Iris Seeds

You might not have heard of our company, but you’ve probably tried one of our delicious scented seeds. What began as a small garden in my mom’s backyard has grown into the best-selling line of garden and home products that are used by thousands of retailers from around the world.Huge, sumptuous flowers with wide, heavily marked petals open over an extended period from early to late summer. Some years ago we were given a few precious seeds from a skilled breeder of these desirable plants and these gems were the result. Their extreme breeding means that very few fertile seeds are ever set. With very few exceptions, they are reluctant to set pods. Around 70% of diploid crosses end up producing seeds, but only 20% of tetraploid crosses do so .....in a good year. In addition tetraploid pods typically contain fewer seeds.

Seed

We are fortunate to have obtained these valuable rare seeds from one of the world's top iris breeders, Davor Cetina from Croatia. He has selected seeds from all of the cultivars shown here, possibly the most valuable selection ever offered to the general public. These include seeds from the following magnificent cultivars: Activity, Aiogata, Aquamarin, Darling, Emotion, Fortune, Fuyijama,Gipsy, Kogesho, Laughing Lion, Loyalty, Moonlight waves, Oase, Oriental eyes, Port Arthur, Rose queen, Summer moon, White ladies. These exquisite, bone hardy beauties deserve a place in every garden, and will improve over the years in either dry or wet soil or even standing in water.

The unusual "Welsh Gladwyn," is usually grown not for its quite pretty pale mauve flowers, but for the bright orange seeds which burst forth from the seed-pods in autumn, but do not fall until spring (as demonstrated in the picture). The botanical name refers to the fact that the crushed leaves smell like roast beef!!! Whole stems can then be cut to make an impressive floral display which lasts until the following year. The genus Iris includes over 200 species of plants widely grown in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 to 10. Prized for their ornate, richly colored flowers and swordlike foliage, most cultivated varieties of iris are grown from rhizome divisions that faithfully reproduce the favorable flowering characteristics of the plant. However, non-hybrid species, such as the Douglas iris (I. douglasiana), will also grow from seeds. The seeds germinate reliably in two to three months if sown in a fast-draining, mildly acidic potting mix and germination is greatly enhanced by soaking the seeds in water for several days prior to sowing. (Source: homeguides.sfgate.com)

 

 

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