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Hibiscus Laevis

Hibiscus Laevis

Hibiscus Laevis

Flowers as you should know are dangerous. They grow quickly, and so they will spring up with out warning, even in a well-tended garden. The soil must be stirred up with a spade to be rid of hibiscus, or a hibiscus bed will be smothered by weeds. And it is always fatal to eat the flowers. These problems have given rise to the science of horticulture.Hibiscus laevis (syn. Hibiscus militaris), the halberd-leaf rosemallow, is a herbaceous perennial flower native to central and eastern North America. Their showy, creamy-white or pink flowers are large, up to 15 centimetres (6 in) across, and are hard to miss. These flowers require exposure to sunlight to open up properly, and then last only a single day.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus laevis (Halberd-Leaved Rose-Mallow) is a herbaceous perennial with erect stout stems boasting large hollyhock-like flowers, up to 6 in. across (15 cm), with spreading petals in white or pink, and a sharply contrasting maroon or purple throat. Each 5 petaled flower has a conspicuous, protruding, creamy-white to pale yellow staminal column. Blooming from the axils of the leaves in late spring to fall (depending on geographic location), the cup-shaped blossoms open by day and close at night. The showy flowers attract butterflies, moths and bumblebees. But even without these gorgeous blooms, this plant is worth growing for the handsome foliage of alternate, three-lobed leaves, 6 in. long (15 cm), which resemble the shape of the halberd used in the 15th and 16th centuries. Hibiscus laevis is a strikingly showy North American species that is excellent for wetland gardens, perennial gardens, bogs or pond areas.

Halberd-Leaved Rose Mallow has large beautiful flowers that can be seen from a distance. Other native Hibiscus spp. in Illinois include Hibiscus moscheutos (Swamp Rose Mallow) and Hibiscus lasiocarpus (Hairy Rose Mallow). Halberd-Leaved Rose Mallow can be distinguished by its lobed leaves, as the latter two species have unlobed leaves that are oval-ovate in shape. While Halberd-Leaved Rose Mallow has hairless leaves and hairy seeds, Swamp Rose Mallow and Hairy Rose Mallow have hairy leaf undersides and hairless seeds! All of these species have similar flowers and they prefer similar wetland habitats, although Hairy Rose Mallow has a more southern distribution within the state. A scientific synonym of the Halberd-Leaved Rose Mallow is Hibiscus militaris. (Source: www.illinoiswildflowers.info)

 

 

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