FutureStarr

Full shade plants

Full shade plants

 

Full shade plants

Do you want to know what might go wrong if you attempt to grow a houseplant from seed in your home?David Beaulieu is a landscaping expert and plant photographer, with 20 years of experience. He was in the nursery business for over a decade, working with a large variety of plants. David has been interviewed by numerous newspapers and national U.S. magazines, such as Woman's World and American Way. Debra LaGattuta is a gardening expert with three decades of experience in perennial and flowering plants, container gardening, and raised bed vegetable gardening. She is a Master Gardener and lead gardener in a Plant-A-Row, which is a program that offers thousands of pounds of organically-grown vegetables to local food banks. Debra is a member of The Spruce Gardening and Plant Care Review Board.

Plant

A distinction should also be made between the terms surviving and thriving. Many plants can survive in full shade, but that is not sufficient for the purposes of most gardeners. Ornamental gardens are meant to beautify a property, and a plant that underperforms (for example, by not flowering as much as it should) is not helping the garden live up to this goal. A plant that is merely surviving is taking up space that is better occupied by a plant that will perform at its best in full shade. Therefore, the best examples of full shade plants cannot just survive in low-light conditions but rather thrive in them.You might easily overlook shrubs when planning a shade garden (many gardeners gravitate toward annual and perennial flowering plants). But do not forget about shrubs, they provide structure and background for that planting bed you are so eager to fill with the smaller, more showy plants that tend to jump out at you at the garden center. The following shrubs are evergreens grown for their foliage and they can add great value to a shade garden.

Supplement the flowers provided by your perennials with well-placed, flowering annual plants. Keep in mind that many of the plants grown by gardeners in northern regions as annuals are actually perennials in warmer parts of the world where they originated (in most cases, the tropics). These plants are too tender to survive in cold-winter climates. This is a case where usage trumps botany. These plants are termed annuals not because of their life cycle but because that is how they are used in gardens in colder climates.Mainly a foliage plant, Hostas are perfect for shade gardens with moist soil. They come in various sizes from as mini as 4 inches to as big as 6 feet long. But beware: Deer, rabbits, slugs, and snails love these plants. If there are lots of deer near where you're thinking about planting them, you might want to reconsider! (Source: www.housebeautiful.com)

 

 

Related Articles