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False indigo plant yellow

False indigo plant yellow

False indigo plant yellow

FALSE INDIGO PLANT! False Indigo Plant is the clever name given to a plant mistaken for real Indigo. Some common symptoms include bluish-green leaves and a slight blue tinge to the veins of the leaves. False Indigo Plant is most likely a seedling of the popular indoor plant Common Date Palm as it is an indoor plant variant.Marie Iannotti is a life-long gardener and a veteran Master Gardener with nearly three decades of experience. She's also an author of three gardening books, a plant photographer, public speaker, and a former Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulture Educator. Marie's garden writing has been featured in newspapers and magazines nationwide and she has been interviewed for Martha Stewart Radio, National Public Radio, and numerous articles.

Plant

False indigo is a large, upright perennial with leaves that are grey-green and beautiful long racemes of indigo-blue flowers that appear in April through June. The pea-like flowers are followed by black seed pods that can be left on the plant for winter interest. With its stately shape, false indigo makes a good architectural statement in the garden even after the flowers have faded. When started from nursery plants, false Indigo takes only about a year to reach its full height, but plants started from seed can take three to four years to flower. False indigo is generally planted in spring after the danger of frost has passed.False indigo plants are very adaptable and are reliably perennial in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 9, but gardeners will need to be patient for a while. You can start Baptisia plants from seed, but they are slow to establish. Even a young nursery plant will take at least a full year to get established before you really start seeing it bloom.

On the plus side, these are very long-lived plants that may outlive their owners. The plant will spread, but slowly, and a mature clump takes on the look of a unique shrub in the landscape.Maintenance is minimal. Plants can sometimes flop over from the center of the clump outward, especially if grown in shady conditions that cause the plant to get leggy. In some situations, a large hoop support can help keep the plant uprights. If you do not deadhead the flowers, you will get attractive seed pods similar to pea pods, which turn dark and rattle in the breeze. You can prevent this by giving your false indigo a modest shearing after flowering. Stalks will need to be trimmed off near ground level as winter sets in—or immediately in the spring before new growth begins, if you prefer to leave the seed heads in place through winter. (Source:www.thespruce.com)

 

 

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