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Drawing a skull

Drawing a skull

Drawing a skull

Draw a wide oval to represent the top portion of the skull. Then add lines that show where the jawbones come down to form the bottom of the skull. Add a vertical line down the center of the face, where the nasal cavity is. Keep in mind, this will not fall in the center of your drawing since the skull faces toward the side. Add horizontal lines to indicate the center of the eyeline, the bottom of the nasal cavity, and the center of the mouth. “Reference lines are like leaving yourself a map,” explains illustrator Ben House. “If you’ve left yourself a roadmap, you don’t have to keep looking at your reference photos, and you can have some fun.”

Drawing

Practice drawing skulls from other views, like a true front view or side view, to get fully acquainted with the anatomy. When drawing a full profile of a skull, it can be important to remember that the spine doesn’t end at the bottom of the jaw; it goes up to the bottom of the back of the skull. “Everything connects to that little spot at the base of the skull,” says Elliott. “If you run your finger up the back of your neck, you can feel where it all connects.” (Source: www.adobe.com)

ull’s main features. Then, draw 2 hexagons below the horizontal line, 1 in each bottom quarter of the circle. These will be the eye sockets. Next, sketch the nose cavity on the vertical line between the two eye sockets. Draw the angular outline of the sides of the skull. Then, draw the upper teeth along the bottom of the circle. Now draw the outline of the jaw coming down off of the sides of the skull. For the final touches, shade in the nose and eye cavities, and erase the guidelines. Finish your skull drawing by shading it in to add more depth. Read on to learn how to draw a side-view skull! (Source:www.wikihow.com)

Skull

With the teeth in place, it’s time to add shading and more definition to your most important lines. The darkest areas on your skull should be the caves of the eye and nose, followed by the empty space underneath the cheekbones, where the jaws connect to the upper part of the skull. “Shading is where everything just pops to life,” says House. “You can get as detailed as you want.”

Practice drawing skulls from other views, like a true front view or side view, to get fully acquainted with the anatomy. When drawing a full profile of a skull, it can be important to remember that the spine doesn’t end at the bottom of the jaw; it goes up to the bottom of the back of the skull. “Everything connects to that little spot at the base of the skull,” says Elliott. “If you run your finger up the back of your neck, you can feel where it all connects.” (Source: www.adobe.com)

 

 

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