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Cyperus

Cyperus

Cyperus

As I discovered, there are hundreds of companies on the internet offering to help you write e-books. But, as you might expect, not all of them are legitimate.The classification of the highly variable genus Cyperus is still unstable. Kern (in Fl. Malesiana, 1974), following Kükenthal (Das Pflanzenreich IV.20, Heft 101: 1-671. 1935-36) with some modifications, not only treated the genus Cyperus collectively, but recognized only 3 subgenera (see also Fl. Europaea 5, 1980). Haines and Lye (Sedges and Rushes of E. Afr., 1983) at the other extreme accepted no fewer than 15 subgenera. The rather conservative view of Goetghebeur (l.c., 1989) is followed here, i.e. the genera Pycreus and Kyllinga are maintained. Within Cyperus several subgenera are recognized instead of only the two by Goetghebeur.

Cyperus

Catholic Univ. Amer., Biol. Ser. 33: 1–147. Marcks, B. G. 1972. Population Studies of North American Cyperus Section Laxiglumi (Cyperaceae). Ph.D. dissertation. University of Wisconsin. Marcks, B. G. 1974. Preliminary reports on the flora of Wisconsin, no. 66. Cyperaceae II—Sedge family II. The genus Cyperus—the umbrella sedges. Trans. Wisconsin Acad. Sci. 62: 261–284. McGivney, M. V. 1938. A revision of the subgenus Eucyperus found in the United States. Catholic Univ. Amer., Biol. Ser. 26: 1–74. Tucker, G. C. 1983. The taxonomy of Cyperus (Cyperaceae) in Costa Rica and Panama. Syst. Bot. Mongr. 2: 1–85. Tucker, G. C. 1994. A revision of the Mexican species of Cyperus L. (Cyperaceae). Syst. Bot. Monogr. 43: 1–214. Tucker, G. C. and R. McVaugh. 1993. Cyperus. In: R. McVaugh and W. R. Anderson, eds. 1974+. Flora Novo-Galiciana: A Descriptive Account of the Vascular Plants of Western Mexico. 8+ vols. Ann Arbor. Vol. 3, pp. 270–344.

Purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) is a colony-forming perennial weed that seriously impacts agriculture across the southernmost United States. Native to tropical Eurasia, purple nutsedge has become a major weed of vegetable, row, and plantation crops in tropical and warm temperate climates around the world, is very difficult to manage with either organic or conventional weed control strategies (William, 1976; Bangarwa et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2008), and has been called the world's worst weed (Holm et al., 1991). Purple nutsedge is one of the most extensively researched non-cultivated plant species on the planet, yet the complexities of its life cycle, and its multiple adaptations to environmental extremes and weed control tactics are as yet incompletely understood. (Source:eorganic.org)

 

 

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