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Cup plant

Cup plant

Cup plant

The cup plant is a type of carnivorous plant with a very unusual appearance. The cup plant has a modified leaf that has a downward-pointing concave surface that serves as a trap for insects and other small animals.Standing tall at around six feet (more in wetter soils, less in drier soils), Cup Plant's yellow blossoms can be seen starting in July when the butterflies visit them, and then later when the birds begin to feed on its seeds. Throughout the growing season, the water held in the leaf cups attract birds and other critters looking for a drink. Cup Plant establishes well in average garden soil or in heavier, wetter soils. It is easy to start from seed by fall planting outdoors, or, if planted in spring, a period of 60 days of moist, cold stratification is recommended prior to sowing.

Plant

A Prairie Moon • July 29 The maps show the historical range (native and adventive) of a native species. Adventive means it was introduced by humans but is growing successfully; and in the case of Cup Plant on the East Coast, it is very aggressive. We don't experience that here in the Midwest. Because of this, I would only suggest planting it after talking to a Professional in your state. Yes, we are surprised Cup Plant was never documented in MD.A Prairie Moon • September 19 No, Cup Plant will come back from the ground up each year. We advocate leaving garden plants fall and winter for food and cover for wildlife. Cup Plant especially is full of nutritious seeds to sustain the birds that stay the winter with us. The stem is also hollow and sturdy and many beneficial insects will overwinter in the stems. When you do perform your spring clean-up, consider just piling the dead Cup Plant stalks to the side until the insects have emerged. A Prairie Moon • May 20 Thanks for writing, Meaghan.

Those are the two times we dig dormant plants for sale as bare roots. As you can see in the root photo reached through the following website link, this species develops deep roots, so you will need to dig deeply and carefully to preserve them.Cup Plant is very tough and, yes, I think it could compete with Japanese Knotweed, although you may need more aggressive methods to eliminate such an invasive plant as Knotweed. You'll note that some areas in the Northeast actually classify native Cup Plant as a noxious weed (pink - as in CT). That is not our experience here in the Midwest. It thrives where planted but does not spread in an overly aggressive manner.We ship using USPS, UPS and Spee Dee. UPS and Spee Dee are often used for expediting plant orders; they will not deliver to Post Office Box numbers, so please also include your street address if ordering plants. We send tracking numbers to your email address so please include it when you order. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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