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Common blue violet

Common blue violet

 

Common blue violet

Blue-Violet is a meticulously crafted collection of eye-catching pieces funneled into a cohesive design. Three dresses, the occasional sweater, and a batch of separates are guaranteed to offer a moment of indulgence or paradise.The flowers and young leaves of the common violet are edible. Viola (violets, violas and pansies) are among the most popular edible flowers in America--and with good reason. Not only are these beautiful little flowers easy to grow, but they are also among the few flowers that actually taste good. The flowers make a nice addition to salads, can be used as a garnish, or made into candies and jellies. Violet leaves are high in vitamins A and C and can be used in salads or cooked like spinach.

Violet

A Prairie Moon • August 4 Hi Gaia, The choice between roots and seeds depend on your budget and priorities. Seeds are much cheaper, but they won't start growing for you until the spring, and germination/growth can be difficult or slow on many Violet species. Roots will already have a year or more of growth under their belt. There are lots of great yellow flowers for shade! I recommend using the filter function on our website to filter for site conditions and bloom color!Native to eastern and central North America, Viola sororia (Common Blue Violet) is a stemless, low-growing perennial with glossy, heart-shaped leaves topped with attractive, large blue-violet flowers with conspicuous white throats. Each flower sits atop its own leafless stalk. In addition to the normal flowers, there are often flowers near the ground that fail to open, but their fruit produces vast quantities of seeds. Blooming in mid spring and sometimes intermittently into late summer, this Violet is so pretty that it is the state flower of Illinois, Rhode Island, New Jersey, and Wisconsin!

Single flower at the end of a smooth to densely hairy but otherwise naked stem. Flowers are ¾ to 1 inch across, slightly irregular with 5 broadly spreading petals, the 2 side petals with thick tufts of white hairs (bearded) at the base. Petal color is typically a deep blue-violet, fading to white then pale yellow at the base, but this is a variable species that may have white or white and blue petals, all typically fading to pale yellowish at the base. The lower petal is heavily veined dark blue-violet, and forms a short rounded spur at the back that barely projects past the sepals. A plant has a few to several flowering stems arising directly from the rootstock.I spotted a Great Spangled Fritillary in my yard and while doing some research with my 8 year old granddaughter we discovered that the host plant for the butterfly is violets. It would be a very nice addition to the site if this information was included. It might help the pollinators if we understood the importance of the native plants. Thank you for this very informative site. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

 

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