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Cinquefoil Plant

Cinquefoil Plant

Cinquefoil Plant

The definition of a weed is "a wild plant growing where it is not wanted and in competition with cultivated plants" but frankly that's a poor definition. A weed is more akin to something from another local that spreads rapidly (not wanted even though you may want it) and crowds out native/ornamental plants (competition) but is not listed as invasive at this time. Not wanted by a single individual hardly constitutes the right to call a plant a weed. We'd each have our own qualifications of what weeds are. What a nightmare! That would make it hard to determine what plants are appropriate to ones surroundings.The non-native Sulfur Cinquefoil is a common plant that occurs in most counties of Illinois (see Distribution Map). It was accidentally introduced into North America from Eurasia. Habitats include limestone glades, pastures and abandoned fields, vacant lots, roadsides, gravelly areas along railroads, compacted soil along grassy paths or dirt roads, infrequently mowed lawns, weedy meadows, and waste areas. This plant prefers disturbed open areas with alkaline soilThe nectar and pollen of the flowers attract Halictid bees, masked bees (Hylaeus spp.), Andrenid bees, Syrphid flies, small butterflies, and beetles (Reed, 1993; other sources). Various aphids reportedly suck the sap of Sulfur Cinquefoil and other Potentilla spp. (Cinquefoil species), including Acyrthosiphon malvae (Geranium Aphid), Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Strawberry Aphid), and Macrosiphum pallidum (Pepper, 1965; Blackman & Eastop, 2013). Other insects that feed on these plants include larvae of Neolasioptera potentillaecaulis (Cinquefoil Stem Gall Midge), larvae of Diastrophus potentillae (Cinquefoil Axil Gall Wasp) and Diplolepis fusiformans (Cinquefoil Stem Gall Wasp), larvae of the sawflies Empria maculata and Fenella nigrita, and leaf-mining larvae of the moth Tinagma obscurofasciella (Felt, 1917; Smith, 2006; Microleps website, 2010). Some polyphagous grasshoppers also feed on these plants, including Melanoplus borealis (Northern Grasshopper) and Melanoplus bruneri (Bruner's Grasshopper); Brust et al. (2008). Because of the high tannin content of the leaves, most mammalian herbivores browse on Sulfur Cinquefoil and other cinquefoils to only a limited extent. As a result, Sulfur Cinquefoil is considered an 'increaser' in cattle pastures. However, there is some evidence that White-tailed Deer and Cottontail Rabbits browse on the foliage occasionally (Sotala & Kirkpatrick, 1973; Martin et al., 1951/1961). There is also some evidence that the seeds can pass through the digestive tracts of White-tailed Deer and remain viable (Myers et al., 2004). This spreads the seeds to new locations. Ruffed Grouse also browse on the foliage of cinquefoils. The seeds are eaten to a minor extent by the American Woodcock, Prairie Deer Mouse, and House Mouse (Martin et al., 1951/1961; Houtcooper, 1978; Whitaker, 1966). Cinquefoil and other Potentilla are easy to grow and look after. The flowering stems should be cut back in the autumn, and a light topdressing of organic matters every spring will do wonders. If you require more Potentilla plants then they can be propagated by taking cuttings in autumn, or by division in the springI hope that you enjoyed this guide on how to grow Potentilla plants. Updated September 2020.If you enjoy the information on this site, then you'll love my book: The Gardener's HQ Plant Growing Guide. Available for Kindle (MOBI), iPad (ePub) and as a PDAshleigh, the definition of a "weed" is: a plant out of place. Whatever it is, you probably don't want it in your vegetable garden. Other than that, the only advice I can give you is to positively ID the plant before transplanting it anywhere. If it is a yellow 5-petaled flower and you think it might be Potentilla simplex, compare the leaves very closely with the other Potentilla species before making a determination. Do try the advanced search for additional options. Finally, just because it's native doesn't mean it's desirableAward-winning Potentilla fruticosa 'Pink Beauty' (Shrubby Cinquefoil) is a bushy deciduous shrub of upright habit boasting masses of clear pink flowers from late spring to the first frosts. Resembling wild roses, the blossoms are so profuse that they literally smother the plant. This information is derived from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Wetland Plant List, Version 3.1 (Lichvar, R.W. 2013. The National Wetland Plant List: 2013 wetland ratings. Phytoneuron 2013-49: 1-241). Click here for map of regionsThe preference is partial to full sun, mesic to dry conditions, and soil containing loam, clay, sand, or gravel. This plant is quite tolerant of alkaline soil. Individual plants typically live for 1-10 years. The seeds can germinate the same year in which they are produced, or they can persist in the ground for at least 3 years and remain viable.Cinquefoil and other Potentilla are easy to grow and look after. The flowering stems should be cut back in the autumn, and a light topdressing of organic matters every spring will do wonders. If you require more Potentilla plants then they can be propagated by taking cuttings in autumn, or by division in the spring.'Pink Beauty' - A breakthough in this species, this plant bears clear pink blooms on a 2' rounded plant. In climates with warm summer nights, the flower color may not hold as well. 'Pink Pearl' and 'Pink Whisper' are two other pink-flowered forms, though the blooms may fade to yellow in warm climatesThe shrubby cinquefoil is an excellent choice for cold climates where many other plants struggle or die. This plant can be a great way to pop some color into your drought tolerant garden. These shrubs are perfect for use in mass plantings, borders, foundation plantings and rock gardens. A popular small garden shrub, Shrubby Cinquefoil is a perennial whose branches remain over the winter, though the leaves die off every fall. Its small, yellow flowers have no noticeable scent, but their nectar is attractive to butterflies, bees, and some flies. Their leaves also provide a food source for some butterfly larvae. These plants require very little care, making them a good choice for revegetation of disturbed areas. When purchased in containers, cinquefoil is planted in fall or spring. This little flower shrub’s versatility helps it adapt to all types of soil, whether rich or poor, dry or slightly moist

Some cinquefoils are grown as ornamental plants. These are generally high species with bright, showy flowers, such as ruby cinquefoil (P. atrosanguinea), Nepal cinquefoil (P. nepalensis), and sulphur cinquefoil (P. recta). Horticultural hybrids such as Hopwood's cinquefoil (Potentilla × hopwoodiana) and tongue cinquefoil (Potentilla × tonguei) have been bred, and there exists a range of cultivars. Some double-flowered cinquefoils have been bred, starting with Victor Lemoine's 'Gloire de Nancy' in 1854. Other taxa and varieties are useful for more specialized gardening purposes, such as rock gardens or swamps. Among the former is the hardy spring cinquefoil (P. neumanniana), the floral emblem of CromartyshireEllie, I don't think undesirable plants have to be among cultivated plants to be considered a weed. Weeds also happen in all manner of natural areas that are not cultivatedVery floriferous, Potentilla fruticosa (Shrubby Cinquefoil) is a compact, bushy deciduous shrub boasting masses of large, rich yellow flowers, 1.5 in. across (4 cm), from late spring to the first frosts. The blossoms are so profuse that they literally smother the plant. They contrast nicely against the foliage mound of small, pinnate, blue-green leaves. Noted for its extremely long blooming season, Shrubby Cinquefoil is an incredibly tough plant, withstanding drought in the summer as well as cold temperatures in the winter. It is also one of the easiest plants to care for. A first-class shrub that is perfect for informal hedging, or for sunny borders. (Source: www.gardenia.net)

 

 

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