FutureStarr

Blue Sage Plant

Blue Sage Plant

Blue Sage Plant

Brand new success story, with a low production rate - helping some of the most challenging issues in North America: the mystery of heavy rains, endangered types of plants and animals, and the reemergence of "stone fruit fruit crops" that have been gone since American settlers arrived.This plant grows up to five feet tall and has opposite leaves that are widely spaced along the stem. The flowers add a wonderful shade of blue in the autumn season when yellow and white flowers seem to dominate the landscape. They occur along a terminal spike with several flowers in each whorl. The flowers are blue and tubular, and the throat of the flower is white. The upper lip is hooded and is much shorter than the three-lobed lower lip, which serves as a landing pad for pollinators.

Plant

This fragrant, perennial plant is a favorite plant of pollinators. A variety of insects visit the flowers, but bumblebees and butterflies seem to be the most attracted to the flowers. Characteristic of the genus Saliva is the atypical pollination mechanism. Two stamens occur at the end of a stalk that acts as a lever, so when insects land on the flower, their backs become dipped in pollen. The unique structure of the stamens is believed to be the driving force in the diversity of this large genus. Also, the floral characteristics of this genus suggests it is a monophyletic group, but recent DNA analysis show it is actually a product of convergent evolution.Growing your own plants from seed is the most economical way to add natives to your home. Before you get started, one of the most important things to know about the seeds of wild plants is that many have built-in dormancy mechanisms that prevent the seed from germinating. In nature, this prevents a population of plants from germinating all at once, before killing frosts, or in times of drought. To propagate native plants, a gardener must break this dormancy before seed will grow.

We dig plants when they are dormant from our outdoor beds and ship them April-May and October. Some species go dormant in the summer and we can ship them July/August. We are among the few still employing this production method, which is labor intensive but plant-friendly. They arrive to you dormant, with little to no top-growth (bare-root), packed in peat moss. They should be planted as soon as possible. Unlike greenhouse-grown plants, bare-root plants can be planted during cold weather or anytime the soil is not frozen. A root photo is included with each species to illustrate the optimal depth and orientation. Planting instructions/care are also included with each order.3-packs and trays of 32, 38, or 50 plants leave our Midwest greenhouses based on species readiness (being well-rooted for transit) and order date; Spring shipping is typically early May through June, and Fall shipping is mid-August through September. Potted 3-packs and trays of 38 plugs are started from seed in the winter so are typically 3-4 months old when they ship. Trays of 32/50 plugs are usually overwintered so are 1 year old. Plant tray cells are approximately 2” wide x 5” deep in the trays of 38 and 50, and 2.5" wide x 3.5" deep in the 3-packs and trays of 32; ideal for deep-rooted natives. Full-color tags and planting & care instructions are included with each order. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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