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Blue false indigo native range

Blue false indigo native range

Blue false indigo native range

Blue False Indigo is a large bush-like perennial, with dense clusters of deep blue flowers on long upright spikes. In its first few years this long-lived plant develops mostly below ground. After the first two seasons the blooms are increasingly showy as the …

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Blue False Indigo (Baptisia australis) is a large bush-like perennial, with dense clusters of deep blue flowers on long upright spikes. In its first few years this long-lived plant develops mostly below ground. After the first two seasons the blooms are increasingly showy as the plant matures. Attractive bluish-green foliage provides a good backdrop to other flowering plants. An excellent specimen plant for formal designs, Baptisia australis is beautiful in naturalized settings, as well. Because of its wide, branching form, generous spacing is advisable. The tough rootstock can be divided in fall or spring when the plant is dormant. Because of its large shrub-like size, blue false indigo works well as a backdrop for other perennials. It can also make an arresting specimen individually or in small groups. It is at home in cottage gardens, meadow plantings and among native restorations. The blooms add vertical interest, while the attractive foliage is a good foil for other flowers throughout the summer and fall and the seed pods can provide winter interest (if not too heavy and flopped onto the ground). It makes a reasonable substitute for lupines in areas where they are difficult to grow.

Blue false indigo has a deep tap root and extensive root system so is best left undisturbed. It can, however, be transplanted or divided in cool weather if kept well watered until re-established. If it needs to be divided, early spring is the best time before the new shoots have elongated.Growing false indigo from seed is possible, though not recommended. False indigo seeds have a hard outer coating, and some type of scarification will improve germination. Soaking them in hot water for at least eight hours prior to scarifying them would be even better, although some gardeners have luck simply planting the seeds in the fall and allowing the winter weather to soften the seed coat. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

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