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Bishop's Cap

Bishop's Cap

Bishop's Cap

Bishop’s cap cactus usually reaches no more than 100 cm (39 inches) in height and up to 20 cm (8 inches) in diameter. It has four or five distinct ribs that increase to eight or more with age. The plant is globose when young, becoming cylindroid as it gains more ribs. The gray-green flesh is covered with white flecks. The fragrant yellow flowers have numerous petals and usually appear in early spring or summer during the day. The preference is dappled sunlight during the spring, otherwise shade is tolerated. Bishop's Cap is usually found in mesic to dry areas of woodlands where the soil contains abundant organic matter, often where there is rocky ground. Most growth and development occurs during the spring when the soil is normally moist.Tray of 50 plants ships week of April 25, 2022. You'll fall in love with the tiny snowflake-like, fringed flowers atop the thin stems of Bishop's Cap. Other easily identifiable characteristics include a single pair of leaves half way up the stem (hence the species epithet "diphylla," or "two-leaves"). The name Bishop's Cap refers to the seed capsules, which are split open to resemble the deep cleft in a bishop's miter. The upright capsules are designed for a type of seed dispersal known as splash-cup dispersal. When raindrops strike the capsule, the splash sends seeds flying up to a meter away. The plants spread slowly by rhizomes and make a wonderful addition to deciduous woodlands and shade gardens. Bishop's Cap can tolerate drier full shade sites, although its preference is for medium soils and partial sun in the spring months. The charm of bishop’s cap lies in its dainty white ¼” flowers with fringed petals held on 8-16” tall racemes above basal foliage reminiscent of maple leaves. The petite flowers are widely spaced and occur above a pair of opposite leaves on the flowering stalk. After flowering, each capsule splits to display shiny black seeds held in a tiny cup. Bishop’s cap flourishes in rich, moist to fairly dry organic soil in partially shady locations. Its rhizomatous growth makes it useful as a groundcover for small areas. Ideal companions include Maianthemum canadense, Actaea rubra, Uvularia perfoliata, Adiantum pedatum and Dryopteris hexagonoptera.Miterwort (Mitella diphylla), also known as Bishop’s–cap, is named for the resemblance of its seed capsules to the hats (known as miters) worn by bishops of the Roman Catholic Church.

If you examine a flower closely, you will see its delicate, 5-pointed, snowflake-like design. Each tiny flower is in the shape of a small cup, with dissected petals arising from the rim of the cup, resembling fine lacework. There is a glandular ring of nectar-producing tissue inside the cup which attracts small bees, flies and ants.Miterwort (Mitella diphylla), also called Bishop’s Cap, is named for the resemblance of its two-peaked fruits to the hats (known as miters) worn by bishops of the Roman Catholic Church. This spring wildflower produces miniature five-pointed snowflake flowers that beg to be examined with a hand lens.Astrophytum myriostigma jaumavense Cactaceae yellow flowers of a tropical home-grown cactus. Blooming cactus astrophytum Astrophytum myriostigma jaumavense Cactaceae yellow flowers of a tropical home-grown cactus. Blooming cactus succulent astrophytum yellow buds and flowers bishops cap cactus stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images Cacti (Cactaceae), wood engravings, published in 1893 Cacti (Cactaceae): 1) Echinocereus reichenbachii (or Echinocereus caespitosus); 2) Selenicereus grandiflorus (or Cereus grandiflorus); 3) Pelecyphora asellifomis; 4) Schlumbergera russelliana (or Epiphyllum russellianum); 5) Bishop's cap cactus (Astrophytum myriostigma); 6) Cephalocereus senilis (or Pilocereus senilis); 7) Escobaria deserti (or Mamillaria chlorantha); 8) Epiphyllum anguliger (or Phyllocactus anguliger); 9) Horse maimer (Echinocactus horizonthalonius); 10) Opuntia macrorhiza (or Opuntia filipendula); 11) Melocactus intortus (or Melocactus communis); 12) Blossom of Echinopsis eyriesii. Wood engravings, published in 1893. bishops cap cactus stock illustrations (Source: www.istockphoto.com)

 

 

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