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Bear Garlic

Bear Garlic

Bear Garlic

The appropriate dose of bear's garlic depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bear's garlic. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before usingToday I use wild garlic – or ramsons as they are also known – in my cooking throughout the plant’s short season, which runs from roughly March through to late June. The best of the crop is to be picked when it is still young. As a smaller, delicate plant, the flavour is light and clean. It can even be eaten in salads at this point. Big, heavier leaves can be less interesting, although they can still be cooked or dried.Harvesting is easy and relatively fun, particularly with children in tow. It’s such a common plant, and in some areas it is more than abundant. Look for nice, tender, bright leaves. I use my sharp penknife to cut small bunches at the base of its stalk. It is possible to harvest the bulbs as well. This tubular structure is a modified leaf stem and very similar to our everyday bulb garlic, although if there is very little wild garlic in your patch it may be worth leaving the bulb in situ.(Bear’s Garlic, Bears Garlic) Bulb-forming perennial native to Western and Central Europe.

This is the European form of ramps, a delightful woodland edible that can be eaten whole, usually lightly braised with other delicacies. Plant prefers cool moist shade and rich soils of woodland or shade garden. Sow seeds in the fall for reliable germination in the spring. Alternately, give 90 days cold, moist refrigeration, then sow outdoors in cool, moist shade. Long term and ongoing germination is typical, so the planting area should be well marked and mulched to limit weeds.Wild garlic is made up of a bulb, stem, leaves, and white, star-shaped flowers. The botanical name is Allium ursinum. It goes by any number of names, including ramsons, buckrams, bear's garlic, devil's garlic, gypsy's onions, and stinking Jenny. (This plant is believed to be a favorite of bears; hence "bear's garlic" nickname and its botanical name.) You can eat any part of the plant and use it any way you would use garlic or some of its other allium cousins. They are one of the first spring greens to pop up. (Source: www.thespruceeats.com)

 

 

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