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Baptisia Bracteata

Baptisia Bracteata

Baptisia Bracteata

Cream wild indigo (Baptisia bracteata*), of the Pea (Fabaceae) family occurs from the Midwest to Texas and the Southeastern states except for Florida. It is also reported from Connecticut and New Jersey. In Arkansas, it occurs mostly statewide except for some portions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain. Another common name is long-bract wild indigo. The genus name is derived from Greek for “to dye”, based on some plants of the genus having been used to produce a blue dye similar to that from the true “indigo” plants (Indigofera spp.). The specific epithet, from Latin, relates to the large bracts subtending the flowers. ]) was under the name Baptisia leucophaea - this taxon is often recognised as a var of Baptisia bracteata (as Baptisia bracteata var. leucophaea (Nutt.) Kartesz & Gandhi) - a treatment we are following here. However, B. L. Turner, in 'Overview of the genus Baptisia (Leguminosae)'; (Phytologia) 88:257; 2006 has treated Baptisia leucophaea as a closely related but distinct taxon. We are currently (2016) awaiting the on-line publication of the Flora of N. America in order to see how it has been treated there before making a decision whether or not to resurrect the species. Even if resurrected, it is most likely that the uses listed below will also apply to Baptisia bracteata simply because the species are so closely related[

One of the earliest plants to bloom in the prairie, Baptisia bracteata (Cream Wild Indigo) is an upright perennial with arching, almost weeping stems clad with alternate, trifoliate leaves. In late spring to early summer, it boasts long spikes of pea-shaped, creamy white flowers, resembling Lupines. They last for about three weeks and are visited my numerous bees, bumble bees, butterflies and skippers. When the flowers fade away, the lovely gray-green, trifoliate leaves remain neat and form a lovely backdrop for the other perennials in the garden. If left untrimmed, the plant forms interesting inflated seedpods turning deep black in the fall. They often remain attached to the naked winter stems and are valued additions to dried flower arrangements. Looking good with almost everything, Cream Wild Indigo prefers open areas where there is reduced competition from taller vegetation. It makes a striking specimen for the small garden where an easy-to-grow, long-lived plant is desired.Cream wild indigo (Baptisia bracteata*), of the Pea (Fabaceae) family occurs from the Midwest to Texas and the Southeastern states except for Florida. It is also reported from Connecticut and New Jersey. In Arkansas, it occurs mostly statewide except for some portions of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain. Another common name is long-bract wild indigo. The genus name is derived from Greek for “to dye”, based on some plants of the genus having been used to produce a blue dye similar to that from the true “indigo” plants (Indigofera spp.). The specific epithet, from Latin, relates to the large bracts subtending the flowers.]) was under the name Baptisia leucophaea - this taxon is often recognised as a var of Baptisia bracteata (as Baptisia bracteata var. leucophaea (Nutt.) Kartesz & Gandhi) - a treatment we are following here. However, B. L. Turner, in 'Overview of the genus Baptisia (Leguminosae)'; (Phytologia) 88:257; 2006 has treated Baptisia leucophaea as a closely related but distinct taxon. We are currently (2016) awaiting the on-line publication of the Flora of N. America in order to see how it has been treated there before making a decision whether or not to resurrect the species. Even if resurrected, it is most likely that the uses listed below will also apply to Baptisia bracteata simply because the species are so closely related[ (Source: temperate.theferns.info)

 

 

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