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blue tongue skink

blue tongue skink

blue tongue skink

Blue-Tongued Skin

"Blue tongue lizard" redirects here. For the Australian Aboriginal myth, see Bluetongue Lizard.

The Eastern Blue-tongue is silvery-grey with broad dark brown or blackish bands across the back and tail. Individuals on the coast usually have a black stripe between the eye and the ear which may extend along the side of the neck. The Blotched Blue-tongue is dark chocolate brown to black with large pink, cream or yellow blotches on the back, and a tail banded in the same colours. (Source: australian.museum)

seaworld.org)Eastern Blue-Tongued Skink Facts aFemales are ovoviviparous ("egg-live birth") - the mother produces egg cases, which she then carries inside her. After the eggs hatch internally, she expels the live young. (Source:nd Information

Why Northern Bluetongue Skinks Have Ultraviolet Tongues

When threatened, the northern bluetongue skink brandishes its UV-reflective, cobalt tongue. (Source: www.nationalgeographic.com)

Why the Blue Tongue?

One of the most unique characteristics of this amazing reptile is its large fleshy blue tongue. For an animal whose color is made up of tans, browns, oranges, silvers, and blacks, it definitely stands out. So what is it for? The bright fleshy blue tongue is used for defense, and to scare off predators. When a skink is approached by something looking to make it into a meal, it puffs up and makes its body as large as it can, hisses loudly, opens its mouth wide, and flattens out that bright blue tongue. The combination of bright pink flesh in their mouth and that dark blue tongue is an unexpected sight and will confuse the predator long enough for them to run away. If absolutely necessary, they can also drop off their tail to get away when attacked. (Source: www.zillarules.com)

Why Do Blue-Tongued Skinks Have Blue Tongues?

Unlike our frivolous emoticon (:-P), sticking one's tongue out is serious business in blue-tongued skink lexicon. (Source: thewire.in)Browse 306 Blue Tongued Skink Stock Photos and Images Available, or Search for Frilled Lizard to Find More Great Stock Photos and Pictures.

Blue tongue skink sitting on old log in Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia (Source: www.istockphoto.com)

Blue-Tongued Skin

"Blue tongue lizard" redirects here. For the Australian Aboriginal myth, see Bluetongue Lizard. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Eastern Blue-Tongue Lizar

The Eastern Blue-tongue is silvery-grey with broad dark brown or blackish bands across the back and tail. Individuals on the coast usually have a black stripe between the eye and the ear which may extend along the side of the neck. The Blotched Blue-tongue is dark chocolate brown to black with large pink, cream or yellow blotches on the back, and a tail banded in the same colours. (Source: australian.museum)

Eastern Blue-Tongued Skink Facts and Information

Females are ovoviviparous ("egg-live birth") - the mother produces egg cases, which she then carries inside her. After the eggs hatch internally, she expels the live young. (Source: seaworld.org)

Why Northern Bluetongue Skinks Have Ultraviolet Tongues

When threatened, the northern bluetongue skink brandishes its UV-reflective, cobalt tongue. (Source: www.nationalgeographic.com)

Why the Blue Tongue?

One of the most unique characteristics of this amazing reptile is its large fleshy blue tongue. For an animal whose color is made up of tans, browns, oranges, silvers, and blacks, it definitely stands out. So what is it for? The bright fleshy blue tongue is used for defense, and to scare off predators. When a skink is approached by something looking to make it into a meal, it puffs up and makes its body as large as it can, hisses loudly, opens its mouth wide, and flattens out that bright blue tongue. The combination of bright pink flesh in their mouth and that dark blue tongue is an unexpected sight and will confuse the predator long enough for them to run away. If absolutely necessary, they can also drop off their tail to get away when attacked. (Source: www.zillarules.com)

 

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