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When to Transplant Delphiniums

When to Transplant Delphiniums

When to Transplant Delphiniums

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After six years of nurturing success, including taking 1st place at this year’s Langley Garden- show, my mother-in-law moved to Florida to take a new job. Planting uprooted the delphiniums from my late father’s garden, which had thrived for years despite the garden being occasionally moved and the property’s rocky soil. I was in for a surprise when I walked around the garden the morning after the move.Choosing the location for delphiniums can be a bit of a balancing act. They enjoy space and sun, so an open area does provide a number of advantages. However, high winds can cause them irreparable damage, so you may need to use some sort of windbreak. All temporary wall or planting close to a fence will usually work best. The flowers may also need to be staked at a later stage to ensure that they grow correctly.

Flower

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Cyclamen Mite: These mites damage plants by sucking juice from stems and leaves. They multiply rapidity in hot, dry weather. They can only be seen using a magnifying glass. Plants will look distorted and stunted, and may not bloom. Flowers will be distorted, streaked and blotched. Leaves can become cupped, curled, dwarfed and thickened. Burpee Recommends: Discard plants that are severely infested. Avoid working with infested plants. Keep plants watered in dry weather. For heavy infestations consult your Cooperative Extension Service for insecticide recommendations. Most delphiniums are hardy perennials, but annual and biennial varieties are also available. The Elatum Group of delphiniums are the most commonly grown and are the tallest type, with spikes of single or double flowers reaching up to 2m. Belladonna delphiniums are shorter, with a looser, more branching habit and single flowers. ‘Pacific Hybrids’ were developed in the 1950s and 1960s, and are short-lived perennials or biennials. They look similar to ‘Elatum’ delphiniums but are shorter. The ‘Magic Fountain’ series of delphiniums are short and more compact, suitable for smaller gardens.

Quite honestly I'd give them a good long chance to make it - plants really want to grow and if they possibly can they will. Provided the root loss was not too huge they shoud do well. Ideally you should remove their flower heads, I know this sounds dreadful, especially in the case of delphiniums, but it is alot to expect of any plant to heal broken roots, make new roots and flower all at the same time. If you can bear to sacrifice the flowers for the next batch, they will stand a better chance of recovery. These extra steps will reward you come late spring! Pacific Giant spires look stately planted in odd numbers of clumps in the back of my sunny flowerbed. Their sculptural form adds structure to the bed and helps guide the eye. Despite being straight and tall, the petals and leaves are lacy and soft, adding a delicate touch. I prefer to stake mine since we can get some big winds here on the Colorado Front Range. After they flower, you should cut them back, fertilize with a phosphorous-rich, liquid fertilizer, and you will often get a second flush of flowers. I cut them down again at the end of the season and thank them for their spectacular display one last time. Next spring, look for the strongest 2–3 shoots in a crown and cut out the others; this is a good time to fertilize with a balanced, or phosphorous-rich liquid fertilizer. Dividing clumps every 1 to 3 years or so can also keep these cool-hued beauties from overcrowding so they can look their best. (Source: www.wedels.com)

 

 

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