FutureStarr

Week in a year

Week in a year

Week in a year

The ISO week year number deviates from the Gregorian year number in one of three ways. The days differing are a Friday through Sunday, or a Saturday and Sunday, or just a Sunday, at the start of the Gregorian year (which are at the end of the previous ISO year) and a Monday through Wednesday, or a Monday and Tuesday, or just a Monday, at the end of the Gregorian year (which are in week 01 of the next ISO year). In the period 4 January to 28 December the ISO week year number is always equal to the Gregorian year number. The same is true for every Thursday. from 1 through 7, beginning with Monday and ending with Sunday. For example, the Gregorian date Tuesday, 21 December 2021 corresponds to day number 2 in the week number 51 of 2021, and is written as 2021-W51-2 (in extended form) or 2021W512 (in compact form). The ISO year is slightly offset to the Gregorian year; for example, Monday 30 December 2019 in the Gregorian calendar is the first day of week 1 of 2020 in the ISO calendar, and is written as 2020-W01-1 or 2020W011.

YEAR

from 1 through 7, beginning with Monday and ending with Sunday. For example, the Gregorian date Tuesday, 21 December 2021 corresponds to day number 2 in the week number 51 of 2021, and is written as 2021-W51-2 (in extended form) or 2021W512 (in compact form). The ISO year is slightly offset to the Gregorian year; for example, Monday 30 December 2019 in the Gregorian calendar is the first day of week 1 of 2020 in the ISO calendar, and is written as 2020-W01-1 or 2020W011. The ISO week year number deviates from the Gregorian year number in one of three ways. The days differing are a Friday through Sunday, or a Saturday and Sunday, or just a Sunday, at the start of the Gregorian year (which are at the end of the previous ISO year) and a Monday through Wednesday, or a Monday and Tuesday, or just a Monday, at the end of the Gregorian year (which are in week 01 of the next ISO year). In the period 4 January to 28 December the ISO week year number is always equal to the Gregorian year number. The same is true for every Thursday.

The US system has weeks from Sunday through Saturday, and partial weeks at the beginning and the end of the year, i.e. 52 full and 1 partial week of 1 or 2 days if the year starts on Sunday or ends on Saturday, 52 full and 2 single-day weeks if a leap year starts on Saturday and ends on Sunday, otherwise 51 full and 2 partial weeks. An advantage is that no separate year numbering like the ISO year is needed. Correspondence of lexicographical order and chronological order is preserved (just like with the ISO year-week-weekday numbering), but partial weeks make some computations of weekly statistics or payments inaccurate at the end of December or the beginning of January or both. In 1752, Europe was using the more accurate Gregorian calendar, which we still use today, but Britain was dragging its heels with the Julian calendar. The big switch happened in September that year, but to catch up with everyone else and to correct the accrued inaccuracy of the Julian calendar, English folk went to bed on Wednesday 2nd September 1752, and woke up on Thursday 14th September 1752. Some sources claim that members of the public rioted, outraged that their lives had been 'shortened' by 11 days! If you want to know how many days have passed since that big switch, by the way, give our days between dates calculator a try. (Source: www.thecalculatorsite.com)

 

 

 

Related Articles