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Verbena bloom time

Verbena bloom time

Verbena bloom time

The location and temperature greatly effect the verbena blossom time.Verbenas are long blooming annual or perennial flowers that possess the virtues of heat tolerance and an extremely long bloom season. Many perennial verbenas are relatively short lived, but their vigor and heavy flowering make up for this defect. They do well grown as annual flowering plants also, since they bloom quickly during the first season after planting.

Bloom

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The search is endless for a plant which blooms profusely, tolerates heat and endures from year to year. Throughout the years we always come back to one of the showiest of perennial flowers -- the verbena. Verbena has many attributes such as heat tolerance, everblooming and enduring. However, since nothing is perfect, verbena has some faults which, if known in advance, can be avoided. Remembering that "a word to the wise is sufficient", I will concentrate this article on the faults of verbena so you can know how to successfully grow one of Texas' most adapted plants.

The pale and dark blues of larkspur are some of the prettiest you'll find in the garden. And they come with little effort. Plant larkspur once and allow the flower heads to ripen, scattering their seed, and you'll be assured of a steady supply of larkspur in your garden for decades. All you'll need to do is pull out the ones you don't want!Larkspur is basically an annual version of delphinium, an all-time favorite perennial. Larkspur produces lovely spikes of blue, purple, pink, or white flowers in spring and summer. They look best clustered in small patches.Like many cool-season annuals, it's a good winter-blooming plant for the Deep South. Larkspur is so easy to grow that it often self seeds in the garden, coming back year after year. Plant larkspur from seed directly in the garden in early spring. Larkspur doesn't like to be transplanted. It prefers rich, well-drained soil and ample water.When hot weather strikes and larkspur starts to brown and fade, pull out plants, but be sure to leave a few to brown and reseed. (Source: www.bhg.com)

 

 

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