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Transplanting Red Twig Dogwood Bush

Transplanting Red Twig Dogwood Bush

Transplanting Red Twig Dogwood Bush

It would be best to transplant it in the spring. At that time you can cut it back by one/third and then dig it. It actually won't be too hard to move after just two years. Remember that dogwood needs to be pruned once or twice a year if you wish it to be shorter. Make sure the new location will be the right one. If there isn't one available, toss your shrub. It does not have runners so when you dig the root ball that is all there is.

New

Red twig dogwoods have good tolerance for most soil and light conditions, and they're one of the few shrubs that thrive in boggy conditions. The best color is on new stems, so a systematic routine of removing a few of the oldest stems each year is recommended. If the shrubs spread too much, use a spade to trim the roots around the base of the plant. The plants can periodically be trimmed back all the way to the ground, which will both rejuvenate the plant and control its growth. Propagation from cuttings or shoots is usually done as the plant is in dormancy. If you choose to propagate by root sprouts, look for ones that have good roots established already. If the sprouts are not well-rooted, pruning about 1/2 of the top of the sprout is helpful to reduce stress on the plant during establishment. You will want to protect the tops of your newly replanted sprouts during the winter with mulch or some other protective material. A safer technique is to use a long, sharp spade (sometimes called a sharpshooter spade) to sever the sprouts from the mother plants, but leave the sprouts in place until spring. It is best to make the cut as close to the mother plant as possible without damaging its bark. "Within six inches or so" is a good rule of thumb. When the soil warms, dig and transplant as you wish. The advantage of this technique is that the roots of the sprouts are little disturbed during the severing process and the new plants will grow a better root system during the cold months and get a faster start in the spring.

Perhaps you are wondering where to get your cuttings from? Well, you can buy 1 plant and take a couple cuttings, or wait a year and take a lot of cuttings next spring. Or you can find a neighbor or friend that is willing to let you take a few cuttings. You can also use an existing dogwood shrub you have, and cut off newer branches for cuttings at the same time you are pruning. In order to have bright red colors, you should be pruning your red twig dogwood, as the newer branches have much more vibrant red colors than older branches.The only bit of pampering to give to these cuttings, is to protect them from the lawn mower by caging them. Use a hanging basket upside down over them and pin it down so they won't get chopped off. Or upside down tomato cages work well too. These will come off as soon as the new plants are visible enough for folks driving the lawn mower to see. (Source: plantaddicts.com)

 

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