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Three Black Teenagers OR

Three Black Teenagers OR

Three Black Teenagers

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Three Black teenage girls with the surname Williams decided to set out for a walk. They didn’t really have a plan in mind, or a destination. They just wanted to start their morning, with a refreshing hike through the woods. That is, until they came across a map of Nashville, which looked unfamiliar to them.

News

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Burai toldBuzzFeed News in April that the project, which showed similar results for other body parts and search terms such as man, woman and child, illustrated societal biases.

If Brock Turner was black, it'd be a mugshot plastered all over the news, a s grad pic of him clean-shaven in a suit. (Source: www.theguardian.com Alt tags are the descriptive words attached to an image or article by its producer, ie, a human, and Google uses these alt tags to bring you “accurate” results. For this particular search the images that appear tend to come from two sources: stock photography and news sites. (Source:www.theguardian.com))

Whenever a news site publishes an article writers will describe the pictures in the caption and alt text, and these news pictures form the source of many of the “negative” images and mugshots that appear. So, if a story is about a white or black teenager committing a crime the image which accompanies it may well be associated with the phrase “black/white teenager”. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

News organisations want page views, and sadly many see the promotion of fear as a great way to reach a big audience. In western countries one of the fears some seek to exploit is the perception of black men as “dangerous”. This perception is evident if you compare the media’s depiction of young black men Tamir Rice and Trayvon Martin, who were 12 and 17 respectively when they were shot dead, and that of Brock Turner, 20, who has just been convicted of sexual assault. The two black teenagers were depicted as criminals and their deaths were blamed on themselves. This narrative was supported by images chosen to portray them with the “young black thug” stereotype. Turner has been depicted as the wholesome white swimming star with a bright future ahead of him – except for the moment he decided to try to rape an unconscious woman. The media portrayed him with a smiling college photo rather than his mugshot. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

A study by the US campaign group Color of Change found that black people account for 51% of those arrested for violent crime in New York City. However, the arrests of black people receive 75% of the news coverage. Why? Because a calculation has been made – even if subconsciously or inadvertently – that these stories are of particular interest to a news audience. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

Burai told BuzzFeed News in April that the project, which showed similar results for other body parts and search terms such as man, woman and child illustrated societal biases. (Source: www.13newsnow.com Read, watch and listen to the latest news, interviews, reading lists and quizzes from Faber authors, staff and our community of readers and writers. (Source:www.faber.co.uk))

The stock photos of white people likely appear because there is a demand for them; individuals or companies are looking to purchase them, said Speaks, pushing them to the top of the page. On the flip side, the mug shots of black teens are typically associated with news stories about their arrests. (Source: www.mic.com)

The search results for the two terms Alli used remain largely the same for now, although, as is often the case, they’re now also full of side-by-side comparisons from news articles. Here’s what they look as of this writing: (Source: fusion.tv)

As BuzzFeed News explained back in April, a number of factors play into what images appear first in Google’s image results, including “[t]he popularity of the image, how frequently it is shared, context such as text around the image, and meta-tagging.” Meta-tagging (or metadata) is information about the image provided by the page the image is from or the image itself, so in the case of “three black teenagers” that description is likely coming from the sites that posted the mugshots, and people are probably clicking on those images. And in general, Google’s algorithms are acting on a lot of inputs. (Source: fusion.tv)

Download our free app on the App Store or Google Play for the latest headlines and breaking news alerts. (Source: www.sbs.com.au Watch SBS World News live daily at 6:30pm on TV and on our app. Catch up on SBS On Demand. (Source:www.sbs.com.au))

'Start sharing, searching and making more positive stories about black teenagers. Ie if there were more stories of black teenagers doing well or positive news they would be higher up in the search results,' he wrote. (Source: www.dailymail.co.uk 'Start sharing, searching and making more positive stories about black teenagers. Ie if there were more stories of black teenagers doing well or positive news they would be higher up in the search results,' he wrote. (Source:www.dailymail.co.uk))

“2. Instead start sharing, searching and making more positive stories about black teenagers. If there were more stories of black teenagers doing well or positive news they would be higher up in the search results.” (Source: www.telegraph.co.uk)

Three White

SAN FRANCISCO — Google image searches for "three black teenagers" and "three white teenagers" get very different results, raising troubling questions about how racial bias in society and the media is reflected online.

Kabir Alli, an 18-year-old graduating senior from Clover Hill High School in Midlothian, Va., posted a video clip on Twitter this week of a Google image search for "three black teenagers" which turned up an array of police mugshots. He and friends then searched for "three white teenagers," and found groups of smiling young people. (Source: www.usatoday.com)

Stark contrast in outcome for search term ‘three white teenagers’, which produces wholesome group pictures (Source: www.theguardian.com)A composite image showing the contrast in Google search results for ‘three black teenagers’ and ‘three white teenagers’. Photograph: Google (Source: www.theguardian.com)

A composite image showing the contrast in Google search results for ‘three black teenagers’ and ‘three white teenagers’. Photograph: Google (Source: www.theguardian.com)

“Three black teenagers” was a trending search on Google on Thursday after a US high school student pointed out the stark difference in results for “three black teenagers” and “three white teenagers”. (Source: www.theguardian.com He and others erupt in laughter when the result for “three white teenagers” show stock photos of smiling, wholesome-looking young people. (Source:www.theguardian.com))

This week Twitter user Kabir Alli posted a video of him carrying out two specific searches on Google. The search for “three white teenagers” produced smiling and happy generic images of white teenagers, while the search for “three black teenagers” produced some generic happy images too – alongside far too many mug shots and what could be perceived as negative images of black teenagers. The video of the search was put up without any explanation, and people predictably reacted emotively; it’s been shared more than 60,000 times. It brought back an internet meme I debunked back in March this year, in which, on the basis of such search results, people on social media called Google “racist”. (Source: www.theguardian.com)

By contrast, a Google image search for "Three white teenagers" throws up photos of happy, smiling groups of friends. (Source: www.bbc.com @husslej posted "@google please Google 'Three black teenagers' and 'Three white teenagers', and then tell us that is not racist." (Source:www.bbc.com))

SAN FRANCISCO — Google image searches for "three black teenagers" and "three white teenagers" get very different results, raising troubling questions about how racial bias in society and the media is reflected online. (Source: www.13newsnow.com)

Kabir Alli, an 18-year-old graduating senior from Clover Hill High School in Midlothian, Va., posted a video clip on Twitter this week of a Google image search for "three black teenagers" which turned up an array of police mugshots. He and friends then searched for "three white teenagers," and found groups of smiling young people. (Source: www.13newsnow.com)

A viral video has brought to light a disturbing thing that happens when searching images online: if you type “three black teenagers” into Google Images, you’ll find pictures of mugshots. Type in “three white teenagers” and you’ll get smiley stock photos. (Source: www.dazeddigital.com)

Yesterday the term ‘three black teenagers’ trended heavily on twitter. (see https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/09/three-black-teenagers-anger-as-google-image-search-shows-police-mugshots) The trend began when @iBeKabir tweeted the results of two Google searches. A search for three white teenagers turned up images of wholesome smiling white teenagers. A search for three black teenagers turned up images of mugshots. (Google images is already going meta over the story, with Google images now turning up images of three black teenagers contrasted with three white teenagers.) (Source: blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk)

On June 6 (that’s Monday, for those of you keeping track at home) Kabir Alli, an 18-year old in Virginia, posted a brief video of himself running a couple of quick Google image searches. First he searched for “three black teenagers” and was met with several rows of decontextualized mugshots. Then he searched for “three white teenagers” and was served up stock photos of relaxed teens hanging out in front of various plain white backgrounds. (Source: fusion.tv Google image searches for 'three black teenagers' and 'three white teenagers' reveal very different results. Source: google images (Source:www.sbs.com.au))

The results for 'three black teenagers' were mainly of police mugshots, while 'three white teenagers' turns up mostly stock images of wholesome-looking young people laughing and smiling. (Source: www.sbs.com.au)

Earlier this week Twitter user @iBeKabir tweeted a video of himself illustrating this difference in results served by Google images when you search for "three black teenagers" versus results for “three white teenagers.” (Source: www.telegraph.co.uk)

 

 

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