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Tech Savvy in Resume

Tech Savvy in Resume

Tech Savvy in Resume

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Two years ago, the average job seeker might have been primarily interested in coding. A handful of tech savvy skills might have helped put them on equal footing with more traditional candidates. Today, technology plays more integral a role that it does in the traditional job market. In fact, tech savvy skills are now standard for a resume, and many employers require them for interviews. More importantly, employers are actually paying attention to the technology skills needed skills when hiring in the future.

Need

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No matter what industry you work in, computers are becoming more commonplace, so you will likely need at least basic computer skills to do your job effectively. If you are good with computers, it is important to list your computer skills on your resume for hiring managers to see. In this article, we discuss what it means to be good with computers, how to improve your computer skills and how to highlight these skills on your resume.

If a job posting only identifies two or three required computer skills, try to emphasize your expertise with those skills rather than adding additional skills to your resume that aren't as relevant to the position. For example, if you are applying for a job that needs someone with experience using graphic design software and content management systems, it is unnecessary to add information about using a word processor or spreadsheets. It's best to adapt your resume to each job you apply for and include only the most relevant skills. (Source: www.indeed.com)

Basic

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Being good with computers means that you have an above-average level of expertise in operating computer software and hardware. Most jobs require candidates to have at least basic computer literacy skills to perform essential job functions, such as sending emails, using a cash register or composing documents on word processing software. Stating that you are good with computers on your resume likely suggests that you know how to troubleshoot minor computer problems, operate a host of software applications and use presentation software efficiently. It may also show that you have some knowledge of SEO principles, databases and analytics.

While it helps to be specific with legal technology you are familiar with, you should also avoid listing overly basic tech skills. Your expertise with Facebook or Microsoft Office, for example, will likely not impress many employers. On the contrary, including these types of basic tech skills will make it appear you are either grasping at straws to demonstrate your tech proficiency, not familiar with tech to any great degree of sophistication, or both. Definitely not the impression you want to leave. (Source: www.onelegal.com)

 

 

 

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