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Teaspoon in a Cupor

Teaspoon in a Cupor

Teaspoon in a Cup

Teaspoon in a Cup is a blog about food, travel and culture like no other. Written by a Canadian expat who has been writing about Europe for over a decade.

Cup

A cup is a very commonly used unit of volume measurement, especially for measuring small volumes at the kitchen or in the garden. 1 cup is the unit approved by the Imperial system and the US customary system, and it is equal to 250 milliliters. There are actually a few types of cups sued around the world, including the US legal cup, Imperial cup, Japanese cup, etc., and they all are different in terms of the value. One important thing to note with these cooking measurement conversions is that they directly translate imperial measurements to their metric counterparts. But, it's common in recipes using the metric system to use weight measurements for dry ingredients instead of volumetric ones. If you don't have a kitchen scale handy, you might have to be a bit clever with your measuring cups.

Most countries use the metric system (officially known as the International System of Units), where every unit is defined using a measurable phenomenon, such as the distance light travels in a second. Some English-speaking countries, including the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia, use measurement systems that originated from an old system called “English units”. To add to the confusion, these systems all use the same names, such as pints and quarts, to mean slightly different measurement amounts. Even within the US, there are differences between the US contemporary system and that used by the US Food and Drug Administration. These differences are small when the amounts are small, but can really add up for larger volumes. For example, a US contemporary teaspoon is 4.93 ml compared to 5 ml in the Britisth Imperial System teaspoon. The difference in a teaspoon of vanilla would be hard to measure even if you tried. But that difference becomes much more noticeable when you consider a gallon of milk, which in the US is 3,785 ml versus 4,546 ml in Britain. That’s over 3 US cups more milk when you pay in pounds instead of dollars! So pay close attention to the origin of the recipe you’re using, since the author may be speaking a different language of measurement. (Source: www.exploratorium.edu)

 

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